Biology (BIOL)

Courses numbered 100 to 299 = lower-division; 300 to 499 = upper-division; 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate.

BIOL 103.  Microbes & You   3 credit hours

General education introductory course. Surveys general information about microbial physiology, biochemistry and ecology that supports more detailed discussion of interesting topics in food, medical and environmental microbiology. Includes subjects of general interest and current newsworthy topics. Credit will not be given if the student has completed any biology course beyond the 100-level prior to enrollment. Suitable for general education requirements, but cannot be used for credit toward the major or minor in biological sciences.

BIOL 106.  The Human Organism   3 credit hours

General education introductory course. Introduces the nonscience major to certain biological principles as they relate to the human organism, provides biological information and understanding of subjects which are relevant to the student's own well-being and role as a world citizen, and increases awareness of the human place in the biosphere. Concurrent or subsequent enrollment in BIOL 107 is recommended for students needing general education credit for a natural sciences laboratory experience. Credit for this course may not be applied toward the requirements for a major or minor in biological sciences. Only one of the following may be taken for credit: BIOL 104, 105, 106 and/or 107. Students wishing to repeat BIOL 105 (no longer offered) should enroll in BIOL 106 and 107.

BIOL 107.  The Human Organism Laboratory   1 credit hour

2 Lab hours. General education introductory course. For the nonscience major. Supplements and reinforces the material covered in BIOL 106 with a laboratory experience. Uses a hands-on approach and covers topics relevant to students and their role in the biosphere. Topics include cell structure, human organ systems, the role of microorganisms in the environment, metabolism, genetics and cancer. Requires no animal dissection. Credit for this course may not be applied toward the requirements for a major or minor in biological sciences. Only one of the following may be taken for credit: BIOL 104, 105, 106 and/or 107. Students wishing to repeat BIOL 105 (no longer offered) should enroll in BIOL 106 and 107.

BIOL 210.  General Biology I   4 credit hours

3 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. General education introductory course. Introduces fundamental concepts in cellular and molecular biology. Includes basic biological chemistry; cell and membrane structure and function; aerobic and anaerobic respiratory pathways; intermediary metabolism and photosynthesis; regulation of cellular activities at genetic and protein levels; cellular reproduction; mechanisms of inheritance at molecular, organismal and population levels; phylogeny and evolution. The laboratory develops skills in the experimental method, basic laboratory procedures and written communication of scientific information using topics related to the lectures. Students may not receive credit for both BIOL 204 (no longer offered) and BIOL 210. Students wishing to repeat BIOL 204 may enroll in this course, subject to the credit limitations indicated above. Corequisite: CHEM 211 recommended.

BIOL 211.  General Biology II   4 credit hours

3 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. General education introductory course. Introduces fundamental concepts of biology as they apply to levels of organization from organisms through ecosystems. Focuses on morphology, physiology, diversity and ecology of organisms. Introduces growth and anatomy, transport of materials, regulatory mechanisms and reproduction in plants; also nutrient procurement, circulation, neural and hormonal regulation, reproduction, immune responses and behavior in animals. Principles of ecology presented include population growth and regulation, interspecific interactions and food webs, and energy flow and material cycling through ecosystems. The laboratory includes a survey of organismal diversity including prokaryotes, protists, fungi, plants and animals. Emphasizes evolutionary trends in the plant and animal kingdoms. Prerequisite: BIOL 210. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 212 is recommended.

BIOL 220.  Introduction to Microbiology   4 credit hours

3 Classroom hours; 2 Lab hours. General education introductory course. For students in allied health fields. Introduces eucaryotic and procaryotic microorganisms and viruses and develops an understanding of microbial growth, including the use of antiseptics, disinfectants, and antibiotics; DNA as the genetic material including DNA replication, protein synthesis, gene regulation, mutation and gene exchange in bacteria; applied and environmental microbiology including water and sewage treatment and food microbiology; resistance to infection, basic mechanisms of pathogenesis, and selected microbial diseases. The lab reinforces concepts learned in lecture and helps the student gain an understanding of and develop competence in basic microbial techniques including the safe handling of microorganisms. Credit earned in this course may not be applied toward the requirements for a major or minor in biological sciences. Students may not receive credit for both BIOL 120 (no longer offered) and BIOL 220. Students wishing to repeat BIOL 120 may enroll in this course. Prerequisite: CHEM 101 or 103 or 211.

BIOL 223.  Human Anatomy and Physiology   5 credit hours

4 Classroom hours; 2 Lab hours. General education introductory course. Presents the structure and function of the major human body systems. Demonstrates the structure and function of certain systems further in the laboratory setting. For students majoring in programs other than biological sciences or biochemistry. Students who have completed BIOL 225 or 226 (both no longer offered) may not receive credit for prior enrollment in these courses and subsequent enrollment in BIOL 223. Students seeking to repeat BIOL 225 or 226 may enroll in this course, subject to the credit limitations indicated above. Students may receive credit for only one of the following: HS 290 or BIOL 223. Prerequisite: CHEM 101 or 103 or 211.

BIOL 309.  Foundations of Human Heredity   3 credit hours

General education advanced further study course. An introduction to the mechanisms and societal significance of development, transmission and population genetics of humans. Draws attention to inborn errors of metabolism and development and the roles of genetic counseling and genetic engineering in their management. Designed for students majoring outside the natural sciences and cannot carry credit toward a biological sciences major or minor.

BIOL 310.  Human Reproduction: Issues and Perspectives   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. A comprehensive survey of the many biological aspects of reproduction. Covers structure and function of the reproductive system, as well as information on in vitro fertilization, fertility testing, contraception, population problems, AIDS, cancer, reproductive issues, ethical problems and other concerns about the control of human reproduction. Prerequisite: any one of the following: BIOL 106, 210 or 223.

BIOL 330.  General Microbiology   5 credit hours

3 Classroom hours; 6 Lab hours. Introduces the structure, function, systematics, ecology and population dynamics of microorganisms emphasizing prokaryotes. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or 211, CHEM 212.

BIOL 370.  Introductory Environmental Science   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Examines the relationship of the earth's human populations to resource use/depletion and to the impact of human activities on the environment. Introduces and uses basic concepts relating to energy, populations and ecosystems as a basis for understanding environmental problems on the local, regional, national and international levels. Course includes diversity content.

BIOL 408.  Biology of Aging   3 credit hours

Cross-listed as AGE 408. An introduction to the phenomenon of aging, including a survey of age-related processes and mechanisms of senescence, emphasizing humans. Prerequisite: a basic course in biology that satisfies the general education requirements.

BIOL 418.  General Ecology   4 credit hours

3 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. Principles underlying the interrelationships of living organisms and their environments from the biosphere to the population level of organization. Some laboratory exercises and class projects conducted at local field sites. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or 211, CHEM 212.

BIOL 419.  Genetics   4 credit hours

3 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. The mechanisms of heredity and variation in animals, plants, and prokaryotes with a critical review of gene structure and function. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or 211, CHEM 212.

BIOL 420.  Molecular Cell Biology   4 credit hours

3 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. Concerned primarily with the molecular biology of eukaryotic cells. Covers individual cellular components (organelles) and processes including the plasma membrane, mitochondrion and energy conversion, intracellular sorting, the cell nucleus and genetic mechanisms, control of gene expression, cell signaling, cell growth and division, cancer, and cellular mechanisms of development. Reviews and demonstrates current techniques and experimental approaches for studying cells. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or 211, CHEM 212.

BIOL 481.  Cooperative Education   1-4 credit hours

Course complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply knowledge gained through coursework to job-related situations. For information, contact the coordinator of undergraduate studies or the cooperative education program office. No more than 4 credit hours earned in BIOL 481 may be applied toward satisfying the requirements for a major in biological sciences. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisite: applicant and cooperative education position approved by the departmental affairs committee.

BIOL 481N.  Internship   2-3 credit hours

Complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment as an intern. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

BIOL 497.  Biology Colloquium   1 credit hour

Research seminars presented by graduate students, faculty and visiting researchers. Requires a written term paper on one of the presented topics. Repeatable once for credit. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisites: two of the following: BIOL 418, 419, 420.

BIOL 498.  Undergraduate Independent Reading   1-2 credit hours

Students perform library scholarship under the direct supervision of faculty and write a report. No more than 6 credit hours earned from BIOL 498, 499 or equivalent independent study courses may be applied toward departmental major graduation requirements. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisites: at least 20 hours of biology coursework that satisfies the major requirements, instructor's consent, a Directed Independent Study Abstract form, and departmental consent.

BIOL 499.  Undergraduate Research   1-4 credit hours

Students perform library scholarship under the direct supervision of faculty and write a report. No more than 6 credit hours earned from BIOL 498, 499 or equivalent independent study courses may be applied toward departmental major graduation requirements. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisites: at least 20 hours of biology coursework that satisfies the major requirements, instructors consent, a Directed Independent Study Abstract form, and departmental consent.

BIOL 502.  Vascular Plants   4 credit hours

2 Classroom hours; 4 Lab hours. An introduction to the structure, reproduction, and evolution of the major groups of living and extinct vascular plants. Includes an introduction to flowering plant systematics. Students earning graduate credit perform a primary literature survey on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor and deliver a 30-minute oral presentation to the class. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 212.

BIOL 503.  Field Botany   4 credit hours

Introduction to the field identification of common flowering plants, the use of technical scientific keys, distributional patterns and general principles of taxonomy. In addition to lecture and laboratory activities, numerous field trips are used to develop botanical skills and reinforce principles covered in lecture. Prerequisites: BIOL 211, CHEM 212, or instructor's permit.

BIOL 510.  Ecosystem Management & Restoration   3 credit hours

Examines the design, implementation, and evaluation of land management plans and restoration projects. Restoration case studies covering a wide-array of ecological systems (e.g. grassland, forest, wetland, aquatic and marine) are used to examine the strengths and weakness of different approaches in these contexts with particular attention to key ecological principles and socio-economic realities. Students produce a written management plan for a site in south-central Kansas. Course includes diversity content. BIOL 418 is recommended. Prerequisite: BIOL 211 or instructor's permission.

BIOL 523.  Freshwater Invertebrates   4 credit hours

2 Classroom hours; 4 Lab hours. Emphasizes the ecology, taxonomy, form and function of free-living, freshwater invertebrates. Half of the course deals with arthropods. Includes methods of collecting, culturing and preserving specimens. Part of the course grade is based on a collection of invertebrates correctly prepared and identified. For graduate credit, students submit a term paper or a more extensive collection within a given taxon. Prerequisites: BIOL 211, CHEM 212.

BIOL 524.  Vertebrate Zoology   3 credit hours

Evolution, distribution, natural history and special characters of vertebrate animals. Students earning graduate credit produce a term paper based on the technical literature on a topic chosen in consultation with instructor. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 212; BIOL 527 is also recommended.

BIOL 526.  Endocrinology   4 credit hours

3 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. The hormonal regulation of bodily functions is considered in representative vertebrate systems, including humans. Students enroll in both lecture and laboratory portions of class. Students earning graduate credit submit a term paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 212.

BIOL 527.  Comparative Anatomy   5 credit hours

3 Classroom hours; 4 Lab hours. An intensive study of representative chordates emphasizing vertebrate anatomy. Students earning graduate credit complete additional assignments chosen in consultation with the instructor, such as a term paper based on technical literature, dissection of additional animals, etc. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 212.

BIOL 528.  Parasitology   4 credit hours

2 Classroom hours; 4 Lab hours. Studies the parasites of man and other vertebrate hosts. Students earning graduate credit produce a term paper based on the technical literature on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 212.

BIOL 529.  Vertebrate Zoology Lab   2 credit hours

Dissection of vertebrates with an emphasis on learning the taxonomy of Kansas families of fishes, Kansas species of amphibians and reptiles, North American orders of birds, and world orders, suborders and families of mammals. Form and function are included. Prerequisites: BIOL 211, CHEM 212. Corequisite: BIOL 524, or instructor’s consent.

BIOL 530.  Applied and Environmental Microbiology   3 credit hours

A characterization of the roles of microbes in natural and man-made environments. Discussions of microbial ecology and communities, interrelationships with higher organisms, biogeochemical cycling, biotechnology and bioremediation. Students earning graduate credit produce an additional research paper based on primary literature on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 212.

BIOL 532.  Entomology   4 credit hours

2 Classroom hours; 4 Lab hours. An introduction to the morphology, physiology, life cycles, behavior, ecology and economic significance of insects. Students earning graduate credit produce a term paper based on the technical literature on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor or develop proficiency in a specific taxon by performing an individual systematics project. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 212.

BIOL 534.  Human Physiology   3 credit hours

An organ systems approach to human physiology. Emphasizes nervous and endocrine control systems and the coordination of body functions. Students earning graduate credit submit a term paper based upon library research on a topic in human physiology chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 531, or instructor's consent.

BIOL 535.  Human Physiology Lab   2 credit hours

4 Lab hours. An empirical approach to human physiology. Students seeking graduate credit submit an additional laboratory report relating the results of a laboratory experiment to those found in the current technical literature. Pre- or corequisite: BIOL 534.

BIOL 540.  Developmental Biology   4 credit hours

2 Classroom hours; 4 Lab hours. Developmental processes in animals emphasizing vertebrates. Centered on the cell interactions controlling differentiation and morphogenesis. Students earning graduate credit complete additional assignments chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 212. BIOL 420 recommended.

BIOL 560.  Plant Ecology   2 credit hours

2 Classroom hours. An examination of the relationship of plants to their environment at the organismal, population, community and ecosystem levels. For graduate credit, a student must prepare and present a 30-minute lecture over one of the topics covered in this course. Prerequisites: BIOL 418 and CHEM 212 or instructor's consent.

BIOL 561.  Plant Ecology Lab   2 credit hours

Laboratory component of BIOL 560. Field trips are an integral part of the course. Emphasizes an experimental approach to plant ecology. For graduate credit, a student must present the results of the library/laboratory project orally, as well as in writing. Prerequisite: prior or current enrollment in BIOL 560.

BIOL 570.  Conservation Biology   3 credit hours

Examines the application of fundamental concepts in ecology, evolutionary biology and genetics to the preservation of biological diversity at the levels of genotypes, species and ecosystems. Topics covered include (1) how biologists quantify biological diversity, (2) threats to biological diversity, (3) tools used to evaluate the level of threat to individual species and to design species management plans, and (4) concepts and considerations for preserve design. Decisions related to biodiversity conservation often have social and economic consequences, students explore these complexities through case studies. Skills developed in this course include critical reading of primary scientific literature, scientific writing and oral presentation. Prerequisite: BIOL 418.

BIOL 575.  Field Ecology   3 credit hours

9 Lab hours. Techniques for analysis of systems consisting of living organisms and their environments. Field trips are required. Students earning graduate credit perform an individual project on comparative community structure and report the results as a technical paper. Prerequisite: BIOL 418 or instructor's consent.

BIOL 578.  Aquatic Ecology   4 credit hours

2 Classroom hours; 4 Lab hours. Introduction to the biological and physical processes that operate in lakes, streams and estuaries. Requires assigned readings, individual projects and field trips. Students earning graduate credit investigate and compare the characteristics and properties of two freshwater ecosystems or investigate a specific taxon or trophic level in a freshwater ecosystem. The results of this investigation are reported as a technical paper. Prerequisite: BIOL 418 or instructor's consent.

BIOL 590.  Immunobiology   3 credit hours

The nature of antigens and antibodies and their interactions. Includes cellular and humoral aspects of immunologic phenomena. Students earning graduate credit prepare a term paper based on the technical literature on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or 211, CHEM 531.

BIOL 595.  Avian Biology   3 credit hours

Presents birds (class Aves) as models in contemporary animal behavior, physiological ecology, evolutionary biology, population ecology and conservation. The laboratory portion of the course teaches field identification of resident and migratory species by sight, song and call note on frequent field trips to a diversity of habitats, and culminates in a field survey of avian species diversity and abundance conducted by each student. Additional laboratory topics are bird banding, determination of age, sex, body lipid reserves, morphological measurement and population census. Student-led discussions of current papers in avian biology are required, as is an all-day Saturday field trip during spring migration through the Central Flyway, which includes south central Kansas. Graduate students must write a term paper on an approved topic in avian biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 212, or instructor's consent.

BIOL 610.  Topics in Botany   1-5 credit hours

Selected offerings in botany. Consult the Schedule of Courses for current offering(s). Students wishing to enroll in courses not listed in the current schedule must complete a Directed Independent Study Abstract form and obtain approval prior to enrollment. Students earning graduate credit produce a term paper based on the technical literature on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Repeatable. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 212 and instructor's consent.

BIOL 610N.  Plant Ecology Lecture and Lab   4 credit hours

Focuses on identifying and explaining key ecological patterns found in plant populations and communities.

BIOL 626.  Reproductive Biology   3 credit hours

Covers the basic organization and function of vertebrate reproductive systems. Includes current concepts and contemporary research from the molecular to the population level. Students earning graduate credit prepare a term paper based on the technical literature on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. BIOL 526 is strongly recommended. Prerequisite: BIOL 420.

BIOL 630.  Behavioral Ecology   3 credit hours

Studies the biological basis of social behavior, stressing the underlying evolutionary and ecological mechanisms. Lectures examine altruism and kin selection, kin recognition mechanisms, sexual behavior, sexual selection and mate choice, mating systems, and reproductive strategies from the perspective of natural selection. Students earning graduate credit write a term paper based on the technical literature and present this in a class seminar. Prerequisite: BIOL 418.

BIOL 640.  Topics in Zoology   1-4 credit hours

Selected offerings in zoology. Consult the Schedule of Courses for the current offering(s). Students wishing to enroll in courses not listed in the current schedule must complete a Directed Independent Study Abstract form and obtain approval prior to enrollment. Students earning graduate credit produce a term paper based on the technical literature on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Repeatable. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 212 and instructor's consent.

BIOL 640AB.  Human Anatomy   3 credit hours

Gives students an understanding of the anatomy of the human body at the 600 level. Emphasis is on the detailed structural anatomy and classification of each of the human body’s organ systems. Students are challenged to begin thinking clinically so as to prepare for a future in the health professions. Includes weekly lectures and laboratories that the student is expected to attend.

BIOL 640AL.  Human Anatomy Lab   2 credit hours

The gross and microscopic anatomy of each human body system is examined in lab through the use of models, diagrams, lab activities and dissections. Dissections include fetal pig full dissection and organ dissections of the following sheep organs: brain, eyeball, heart and kidney.

BIOL 660.  Topics in Microbiology   1-4 credit hours

Selected offerings in botany. Consult the Schedule of Courses for current offering(s). Students wishing to enroll in courses not listed in the current schedule must complete a Directed Independent Study Abstract form and obtain approval prior to enrollment. Students earning graduate credit produce a term paper based on the technical literature on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Repeatable. Prerequisites: BIOL 330 and instructor's consent.

BIOL 661.  Pathogenic Microbiology   3 credit hours

Focuses on those microbes that produce disease. Most coverage is given to those microbes that cause disease in humans, but zoonotic diseases are also covered. In addition to describing the features of each microbe that enable its pathogenesis, attention is given to the distinctive aspects of its epidemiology, its means of spread and effective countermeasures. Prerequisite: BIOL 330 or instructor’s consent.

BIOL 662.  Virology   3 credit hours

Focuses on the following aspects of viruses: structure, function, replication strategy, host cell interactions and mechanism of variability. Additional topics include the coevolution of viruses and their host cells, the unique ecological niche occupied by viruses, and the challenge that viruses present when attempting to draw clear distinctions between living and nonliving entities. Prerequisite: BIOL 330 or instructor’s consent.

BIOL 666.  Special Topics in Biochemistry   3 credit hours

Primarily for students who choose the biochemistry field major. Discusses a small number of current problems in biochemistry in depth. Requires reading published research papers in the field. Students earning graduate credit produce a term paper based on the technical literature on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: BIOL 204 (no longer offered) or BIOL 211, CHEM 662 and 663.

BIOL 669.  Research in Biochemistry   2 credit hours

Cross-listed as CHEM 669. Primarily for students who choose the biochemistry field major. Requires participation in a biochemistry research project under the direction of a faculty member and a written report summarizing the results. May be repeated once for credit. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisites: BIOL 420 and CHEM 662 or 663, and CHEM 664 and instructor's consent.

BIOL 710.  Glycobiology   3 credit hours

Introduction to glycoprotein biosynthesis, structure and function. Covers the various roles of carbohydrates in modifying protein structure and function. Students earning graduate credit prepare a term paper based on the technical literature on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: BIOL 420.

BIOL 725.  Biodiversity Analyses   3 credit hours

Surveys the theory, principles, metrics and applications of biodiversity sciences including systematics, biogeography and phylogeny. The pervasive role of phylogenetic data in evolutionary biology (e.g., biogeography, coevolution, speciation, conservation) and other fields (e.g., epidemiology, anthropology, agriculture) are highlighted. Species diversity, species radiations, structure of the tree of life, the wealth of comparative data (from genes to proteins and morphology) and the role of systematics in conservation biology are discussed. Offered fall, even years.

BIOL 730.  Cancer Biology   3 credit hours

The basic mechanisms of carcinogenesis are covered by discussing the control of normal and abnormal cell growth in several model systems. Students earning graduate credit also submit a term paper dealing with a specific topic to be determined by discussion with the instructor. Prerequisite: BIOL 420.

BIOL 737.  Aquatic Toxicology   3 credit hours

The qualitative and quantitative study of the fate and effects of toxic agents in the aquatic environment. Class examines the concentrations or quantities of chemicals that occur in the aquatic environment. Includes a detailed study of the transport, distribution, transformation and ultimate fate of various environmentally important chemicals. Class is for undergraduate or graduate students interested in advanced training in toxicology. Prerequisites: BIOL 418 or equivalent, CHEM 531 or equivalent, or instructor's consent.

BIOL 738.  Plant and Animal Interactions   3 credit hours

Develops and expands basic ecological and evolutionary concepts presented in earlier biology courses including natural selection, coevolution, population growth and factors structuring ecological communities. Applies these concepts to the study of herbivory, pollination by animals and seed dispersal by animals. Designed to improve students' abilities to read current primary scientific literature critically with particular emphasis on identifying and evaluating evidence for hypotheses in ecology and evolutionary biology. Introduces the peer review process and hones students' scientific writing skills. Students write a mini-review article of a current hypothesis in the field of plant-animal interaction. An oral presentation based on the findings of the mini-review is also required. Prerequisites: BIOL 418 or equivalent general ecology course.

BIOL 740.  Topics in Graduate Biology   2-4 credit hours

Lecture, laboratory, field techniques, selected readings or discussion course pertaining to a specific biological topic not available in the regular curriculum. May include oral presentations(s) and/or written paper(s). Topics are developed by individual faculty members and reflect current topics, in-depth analysis and biological specialties. May be taken more than once for credit up to 6 hours. Prerequisites: any two of the following three courses: BIOL 418, 419, 420; and instructor's consent.

BIOL 760.  Experimental Molecular Biology   4 credit hours

2 Classroom hours; 4 Lab hours. Introduces upper-level undergraduate and graduate students to molecular biology techniques. The methodology primarily involves the manipulation of DNA and the expression of genetic material in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 419 or 420.

BIOL 767.  Mechanisms of Hormone Action   3 credit hours

The mechanism of action of several hormones is described and used to illustrate the major intracellular signal transduction pathways. Includes gonadotropin-releasing hormone, the glycoprotein hormones, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, chorionic gonadotropin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, steroid hormones, thyroid hormone, activin/inhibin, prostaglandins, insulin and growth hormone. Mostly lectures covering signal transduction pathways. Students write brief summaries of recent research papers related to the current week's lecture topics. Each student makes an oral presentation of a research paper in journal club format. Students earning graduate credit write a term paper describing in detail a hormone not described in class and its mechanism of action. Prerequisites: BIOL 420 and CHEM 662 or their equivalents, plus either BIOL 526 or 534 or their equivalents, and instructor's consent.

BIOL 773.  Statistical Applications in Biology   3 credit hours

Introduction to experimental designs and statistical analyses that are commonly used in biological research. Focuses on univariate statistical analyses including t-tests, analysis of variance, nonparametric equivalents of ANOVA, linear regression, goodness-of-fit tests and categorical data analysis. Applications to research questions that arise in biological research, including the students' own research, are emphasized. Students also receive training in the use of statistical analysis computer software. Previous enrollment in STAT 370 is recommended.

BIOL 780.  Molecular Genetics   3 credit hours

Studies the physiochemical nature of genetic material and the mechanisms of genetic regulation of metabolism. Students earning graduate credit produce a term paper and deliver a class seminar based on the technical literature on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: BIOL 419.

BIOL 781.  Cooperative Education in Biology   1-4 credit hours

Students pursuing the nonthesis MS degree may gain practical professional experience, under academic supervision, that complements the student's academic program. BIOL 781N is for internships that last no more than one semester or summer and may be unpaid. The intern experience to be used for credit must be approved by the student's graduate capstone project committee. An academic product from the experience, such as a written summary and/or oral presentation is assigned by the graduate capstone committee. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisite: acceptance into MS program.

BIOL 781N.  Internship in Biology   1-4 credit hours

Students pursuing the nonthesis MS degree may gain practical professional experience, under academic supervision, that complements the student's academic program. BIOL 781N is for internships that last no more than one semester or summer and may be unpaid. The intern experience to be used for credit must be approved by the student's graduate capstone project committee. An academic product from the experience, such as a written summary and/or oral presentation is assigned by the graduate capstone committee. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisite: acceptance into MS program.

BIOL 797.  Departmental Seminar   1 credit hour

Forum for the weekly presentation and discussion of research projects performed by invited scientists from outside departments and institutions, departmental faculty and graduate students. All MS degree-bound graduate students are required to attend the seminar each semester and must enroll in the course for credit during two semesters. Students enrolled in the course must attend all seminars presented in the course, fill out an evaluation of each seminar and make one 15 minute professional-meeting style presentation of their research. Repeatable up to 5 credit hours. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: acceptance into MS program.