AC - Applied Computing

Courses numbered 100 to 299 = lower-division; 300 to 499 = upper-division; 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate.

AC 121.  Cybersecurity Awareness   (3).

The ability to secure information and systems within a modern enterprise in this modern globalized environment is a growing challenge. Ever-present human threats are global, persistent and increasingly sophisticated. Natural threats are unpredictable but inevitable. Vulnerabilities within the complex and interdependent system of systems continue to be discovered with many more yet to become common knowledge. Exploited vulnerabilities can have a devastating impact on an organization or even a society. This course is designed to familiarize users with information, cyberspace and security principles needed to understand these threats. To this end, the course addresses a range of topics, including information infrastructures, social engineering, information system exploitation techniques and countermeasures to the threats discussed.

AC 201.  Introductory Design Project   (1).

The first of the three-course project design series. The course introduces students to project design, prototyping, engineering standards and professional reports. Students are part of teams, learn prototyping skills and have hands on experiences in a maker-space. Students learn project management tools, team working tools, how to perform market research and develop videos, and prototype development. Prerequisite(s): either WSUE 102A, WSUE 102B, ENGR 302, ID 300 or instructor's consent.

AC 222.  Applied Computing and Networking I   (3).

Information technology (IT) virtually connects people and businesses in the world. The daily operations of every organization in the public and private sector heavily rely on the internet. This course allows students to gain vital concepts on computer hardware, operating systems, networking and security to solve real-world computing challenges. This course is a key for anyone who wants to gain specialized skills in the computing sector. Students collaborate effectively and think critically to develop specialized skills in computing and networking. Students learn to use industry-standard tools through hands-on class projects. The course covers fundamental concepts of the computer hardware; Linux and Windows operating systems; virtualization; computer networking including OSI layer, LAN, WAN and VPN; and basic network security including hashing and encryption.

AC 301.  Junior Project   (2).

Second course in four-course project sequence. Introduces students to engineering design concepts with an entrepreneurial mindset. This includes customer discovery and value creation techniques as well as engineering design and project management tools. Prerequisite(s): AC 201 or ENGR 205 or instructor's consent.

AC 305.  Intermediate Design Project   (2).

The second of the three-course project design series. In this intermediate course, students learn the importance of the voice of the customer, the customer/product market fit through using the business model canvas, and engineering design tools. Students learn and practice customer interview techniques and, through the feedback, help to develop appropriate solutions and prototypes. Students perform individual observations to discover unmet needs in industry and, after refining the needs, teams form to solve these needs. Comprehensively covers the student’s concentration in applied computing and its applications. Students work with faculty and external consultants and industry to refine their team based senior project. Prerequisite(s): AC 201 or instructor's consent.

AC 321.  Applied Computing and Networking II   (3).

This course is a continuation of Applied Computing and Networking I. In this course, students go into more depth of Windows and Linux operating systems operation and administration. Also, more detailed topics are covered on OSI 7-Layer Model, common networking protocols and services (heavier on Layers 5 through 7), VOIP, etc. Students go into more depth on network enterprise design and operation including wireless and mobile technology usage and system operation as well as introduce IoT, cloud services (web-based storage, applications, services, hosts). Prerequisite(s): AC 222 or MIS 325.

AC 322.  Applied Programming and Scripting   (3).

Good scripting skills are vital to IT experts in the fields of information security. This course is designed for cybersecurity professionals who are interested in learning basic coding skills to perform the cybersecurity tasks more efficiently. The course assists students in taking their cybersecurity career to the next level by teaching the vital skills needed to develop as well as customize applications that interact with file systems, databases, networks and websites. Covers command shell scripting (cmd, powershell, bash) in Windows and Linux operating systems. Emphasizes scripting cybersecurity tasks such as system configuration, system auditing and penetration testing. Also covers Arduino microcontrollers, coding Arduino in Python and coding TCP Traceroute. Python language is used in this course. Prerequisite(s): AC 222 or MIS 325.

AC 324.  Applied Web Applications and Database Development   (3).

When browsing on a web application, look for two things: how user-friendly the web app is and how the information is stored, controlled and used. Each web application has a set of requirements such as financial transaction, customer information, etc. The course covers web and database technologies, services, protocols, design and operation. Students learn a variety of languages including HTML, CSS, Apache and MySQL. Course is designed to apply the languages through hands-on projects. Prerequisite(s): AC 222 or MIS 325.

AC 326.  Cyber Operations   (4).

Covers concepts related to cyber attack, penetration testing, cyber intelligence, cryptography and cyber defense. Students learn the attacker's perspective and how security infrastructure integrates with the rest of the business and IT infrastructure through the use of hands-on projects. Prerequisite(s): AC 121, AC 321 and AC 322 .

AC 363.  Human Threats to Cybersecurity   (3).

Kevin Mitnick, who popularized the term “social engineering,” explained that it is much easier to trick someone into revealing a password for a system than to exert the effort of hacking into the system. Mitnick claims that this social engineering tactic was the single-most effective method in his arsenal. This course covers human threats to cybersecurity in political, social and economic contexts. It includes targeted exploitation/manipulation of individuals, small groups and larger groups through social engineering, marketing, propaganda, psychological operations by personal contact, email, social networking, web and RF transmission. Prerequisite(s): AC 121 .

AC 401.  Senior Project I   (3).

The third of the four-course project design series. In this intermediate course, students learn the importance of the voice of the customer, the customer/product market fit through using the business model canvas, and engineering design tools. Students learn and practice customer interview techniques and, through the feedback, help to develop appropriate solutions and prototypes. Students perform individual observations to discover unmet needs in industry and, after refining the needs, teams form to solve these needs. Comprehensively covers the student’s concentration in applied computing and its applications. Students work with faculty and external consultants and industry to refine their team based senior project. Prerequisite(s): AC 301 or instructor's consent.

AC 402.  Senior Project II   (3).

Comprehensively covers the student’s concentration in applied computing and its applications. Students continue to work in their teams with faculty and external consultants and industry to refine and develop a final solution for their team based senior project. Prerequisite(s): AC 401.

AC 403.  Senior Design Project   (3).

The last of the three-course project design series. Comprehensively covers the student’s concentration in applied computing and its applications. Students continue to work in their teams with faculty and external consultants and industry to refine and develop a final solution for their team based senior project. Prerequisite(s): AC 305 or instructor's consent.

AC 461.  Digital Forensics   (3).

Covers concepts related to hardware and software forensics, incident response, cyber crime and cyber law enforcement. Students learn different aspects of computer and cyber crime and ways to uncover, protect, exploit and document digital evidence. Students are exposed to different types of tools (both software and hardware), techniques and procedures, and are able to use them to perform rudimentary forensic investigations. Focuses on the entire life cycle of incident response including preparation, data collection, data analysis and remediation. Real world case studies reveal the methods behind and remediation strategies for today's most insidious attacks. Prerequisite(s): AC 326 .

AC 462.  Cyber Physical Systems   (4).

Focuses on trustworthy and resilient CPS, starting with NIST's CPS Framework. Students learn about common IoT infrastructures, integrate CPS into organizational risk management, and conduct cybersecurity risk assessments for critical cyber physical systems. Prerequisite(s): ENGR 220 and AC 326, or instructor’s consent.

AC 463.  Cyber Risk Management   (3).

This course covers application of risk and information security management to improve organizational resilience. Concepts include business impact analysis, incident response planning, disaster recovery planning, business continuity planning and security auditing. Prerequisite(s): AC 326.

AC 464.  Web Application Security   (3).

Develops an understanding of common web-based vulnerabilities and their impacts. Concepts include development and management of secure web-based systems, security mitigation strategies and penetration testing. Prerequisite(s): AC 324 and AC 326 .