Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Ronald R. Matson, dean
200 Lindquist Hall • (316) WSU-6659

http://wichita.edu/las
Charles Koeber, senior associate dean
Marche Fleming-Randle, assistant to the president for diversity, and senior assistant dean
Cheryl Miller, senior assistant dean

LAS Advising Center
115 Grace Wilkie Hall
(316) WSU-3700
Advising webpage

The mission of Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is to cultivate intellectual curiosity and foster contemplation of the human experience and the natural world. Faculty members are dedicated to creating, expanding, applying and preserving knowledge, and to introducing students to the scholarship, theories, methods and perspectives of their diverse disciplines. A liberal arts and sciences education develops transferable analytical skills — the capacity to gather and interpret information, think critically and communicate effectively — and stimulates a lifelong love of learning that enriches graduates and their communities.

Fairmount College offers undergraduate majors in natural sciences, social sciences, humanities and programs of professional training. An education in these disciplines helps students develop knowledge and appreciation of our physical and biological world, the arts and different cultures; and an awareness of civic responsibilities, as well as professional preparation. Fairmount College provides foundation coursework, as well as general education, and courses required for graduation from other colleges at WSU. These provide students with skills that are intrinsically valuable and often fundamental to professional training and the needs of the workplace.

Admission

Students are admitted to Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences upon meeting the general admission requirements for Wichita State University and declaring one of three categories:

  1. Degree-bound. These students enter with the intention of pursuing one of the degree programs offered by Fairmount College;
  2. Degree-bound as an exploratory student. These students have not yet decided on a major area of study when they enter WSU; and
  3. Nondegree-bound. These students enroll in classes or programs for purposes other than achieving a degree.

Admissions details are in the Admissions section of this catalog.

Probation and Dismissal Standards

  1. Students are placed on probation whenever their cumulative or WSU grade point average falls below 2.000 and they have attempted at least 6 credit hours at Wichita State University.
  2. Probation is removed when the cumulative and WSU grade point averages reach the required 2.000 level.
  3. Students continue on probation when they earn a 2.000 or better semester average but their cumulative or WSU grade point average remains below 2.000.
  4. Students will be dismissed at the end of any semester on probation if they fail to earn a semester grade point average at or above the minimum required, and have a cumulative or overall WSU grade point average also below the minimum required. Students are not academically dismissed at the end of a semester unless they began that semester on academic probation.
  5. When dismissed, students may re-enroll only with the permission of the university’s Committee on Admissions and Exceptions, which considers petitions forwarded by the Fairmount College Admissions and Exceptions Committee.

Students who have been dismissed for academic reasons may seek readmission to the university by filing a written petition with the Fairmount College Admissions and Exceptions Committee. Cases for readmission must be developed by the student after consultation with an advisor. The petition is then considered by the Fairmount College committee and forwarded to the university’s committee for final action.

Because advising and advance planning require careful attention and much time, students must meet the published deadlines to have their petitions considered.

Enrollment Limits

Students in good academic standing may enroll for a maximum of 19 credit hours during fall and spring semesters and a maximum of 12 credit hours during the summer session. Students wishing to enroll beyond these limits must request approval from an academic advisor in the LAS Advising Center (LASAC).

Academic Advising

Academic advising is an ongoing educational partnership between the student and the academic advisor. Advising promotes student academic success, supports diverse and equitable educational experiences, encourages students to become self-directed learners, responsible decision makers and knowledgeable global citizens. Academic advisors assist students in clarifying self-defined academic goals, selecting a major, understanding academic procedures, and using campus resources to their advantage. The Liberal Arts and Sciences Advising Center (LASAC) assists students who are degree-bound, exploratory or nondegree-bound.

Degree-Bound Students in Fairmount College Programs

Degree-bound students who have declared interest in any of Fairmount College’s programs receive advising from department faculty. Students with early and sustained involvement in their major departments develop methods of inquiry, peer and mentoring relationships, and intellectual and social perspectives which deepen and enrich their Fairmount College experience. Students with interdisciplinary or preprofessional interests also benefit from contact with faculty advisors qualified to discuss educational programs leading to the exercise of civic and social responsibility, enjoyment of intellectual pursuits, and realization of career fulfillment.

Degree-Bound Exploratory Students

LASAC advisors help degree-bound exploratory students make academic choices that allow for flexibility while pursuing general education requirements so that they may transfer to any college within WSU once a major is declared. Students develop educational planning skills, develop effective college-level study skills, choose an academic major, develop personalized academic and career/life plans, and complete part of the general education requirements. When a student declares a major field of study, an immediate transfer occurs to the college and department that sponsors that program. Exploratory students must declare a major or a degree preference within the first 48 credit hours of enrollment. Those students transferring 48 credit hours or more must declare a major or degree preference during the first semester of enrollment. Advising is then provided through the student’s academic major department. General education questions are answered by LASAC academic advisors. Advice on the major is given by the main department.

Nondegree-Bound Students

The nondegree-bound category includes students from other colleges who attend WSU for a short time period, high school guests who attend classes and earn credit on the WSU campus, and high school students in concurrent enrollment partnerships who earn WSU credit while taking classes in their high schools. Other nondegree students take courses to pursue their education with no immediate degree plans. This may involve self-enrichment, job advancement, career change, skills updating or professional certification. Students in this latter category are admitted as open admissions students. (See the information in the Undergraduate Admission section of the catalog.) LASAC advisors can assist students in defining their academic goals and in making the transition to a degree-earning status where that is appropriate. Students in this category are not eligible for financial aid.

Application for Graduation

Students apply for graduation when they have completed 80 credit hours of coursework that counts toward the degree. Applying at this time facilitates scheduling required courses for the three or four semesters that typically remain before graduation.

Two documents are required of all students graduating with a degree from Liberal Arts and Sciences:

  • the Senior Form and
  • the online Application for Degree.

The Senior Form is a written list of all remaining requirements for graduation. Students begin in the LAS Advising Center in 115 Grace Wilkie Hall. The student and the academic advisor complete the general education portion of the form. The student takes the form to the faculty advisor for their major. The faculty advisor completes the academic major portion of the form. The student is responsible for returning that form to the LAS Advising Office.

The online Application for Degree (AFD) is the only document that alerts the college of the semester and year in which the student intends to graduate. A student who does not complete this document will not graduate, because the student’s name will not appear on the graduation list generated by the AFD.

How to complete the AFD: The online application for degree link can be found in the myWSU portal. Students are able to complete the application for a bachelor’s degree once they have earned 80 hours. Students may apply for a graduation date for the current semester, or for any of the three semesters beyond the current semester. The correct graduation date is determined by the length of time needed to complete remaining requirements as listed on the Senior Form.

Students who wish to have their names listed in the official commencement program must complete both the Senior Form and the online Application for Degree by March 1, for a May graduation, and October 1, for a December graduation.

Additional application process for students earning the Bachelor of General Studies degree: Students declare their intention to earn this degree and create a plan of study for completion no later than 30 hours before the degree is granted. Students are advised by the academic department of the primary concentration or by an LASAC advisor.

Additional BGS requirements are listed under Section XII. BGS: Area of Concentration.

Assessment of Academic Programs

Fairmount College participates in a university-wide program to assess the effectiveness of all curricula and instruction within the university. Individual departments within Fairmount College have established assessment strategies which are shared with their students. Assessment activities involving students occur throughout enrollment.

Cross-Listed Courses

Selected courses in the university curriculum are cross-listed because course content is suitable to more than one academic area. Every department or program which offers cross-listed courses provides a separate catalog description. When enrolling in cross-listed courses, students — in consultation with their advisors — may select the listing under which they wish to receive credit, but credit may be earned under only one of the course listings.

Field Trips

Attendance on field trips is mandatory in any course that includes in its catalog description a statement that field trips are required or in which the instructor states that field trips are essential for earning credit. Absences are permitted only with the instructor’s approval. Students may have credit withheld for a course if they do not complete the required field trips.

Credit for Life Experience

Fairmount College awards life experience credit. LAS requires that the learning from life experience fits the approved curriculum of the college. Students must be fully admitted to WSU. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is conservative in protecting the autonomy of the faculty and the goals of the curriculum. Credit for life experience is granted only when a student’s learning from life experiences duplicates the content of a course described in the catalog. Students pay for Life Credit on a course by course basis. The student begins by contacting an advisor in the LASAC to obtain the Credit for Life Experience form. The student contacts the faculty member who teaches the course that duplicates the student’s life experience. That faculty member must certify that the life experience is the same as the content of the course. The student returns the signed form to the LASAC, which facilitates the process for student payment and posting the credit to the student’s transcript.

Cooperative Education and Internships

Fairmount College participates in the cooperative education program which matches paid internships with undergraduate and graduate students who wish to combine their classroom studies with academically related employment. In LAS, a maximum of 12 hours of cooperative education credit may be applied to baccalaureate degree requirements.

Interested students should contact the Career Development Center, located in Brennan Hall III, at the corner of 17th Street and Yale Avenue. The telephone number is (316) 978-3688, or register online.

Academic Honesty and Code of Conduct

The faculty of Fairmount College strongly endorses the statement on academic honesty, the student code of conduct and the appeals procedure outlined in the Student Handbook. (Also see Student Academic Honesty, Student Code of Conduct and Court of Student Academic Appeals in this catalog.)

Undergraduate

The Associate of Arts, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of General Studies degrees are conferred by Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Each baccalaureate degree requires the completion of a minimum of 124 credit hours, the attainment of an overall grade point average of 2.000 including transfer work, a grade point average of 2.000 in the major and minor fields of study, and a 2.000 WSU grade point average. Some majors may require a higher GPA.

The Associate of Arts degree requires completion of a minimum of 65 credit hours including 15 hours in residency at Wichita State University and 50 of the 65 credit hours from liberal arts and sciences departments. This degree must include the 42 credit hours required in the university’s general education program (described in the General Education section of this catalog), and students must be enrolled in one of the university’s degree-granting colleges. A cumulative grade point average of 2.000 is required for both the degree and for WSU academic work.

Bachelor of Arts degrees are offered in anthropology, biological sciences, chemistry, communication, economics, English, geology, history, mathematics, modern and classical languages and literatures (French and Spanish), philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, social work, sociology and women’s studies. Concentrations in communication sciences and disorders, ethnic studies, geography, German and religion may be designed with the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of General Studies degrees.

The Bachelor of Science is available in biological sciences, chemistry, criminal justice, forensic sciences, geology, mathematics and physics.

The Bachelor of General Studies requires breadth in distribution of coursework and allows for the development of areas of concentration which may be thematically or occupationally related. This degree is available through every college department.

Graduate

Graduate programs are offered through the Graduate School in many liberal arts and sciences areas. The Master of Arts (MA) may be earned in anthropology, communication (interdisciplinary), criminal justice, English, history, psychology, social work, sociology and Spanish. The Master of Science (MS) may be obtained in biological sciences, chemistry and mathematics.

The Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in creative writing, the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (MALS) in interdisciplinary studies, the Master of Public Administration (MPADM) in public administration, and the Master of Social Work (MSW) in social work.

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree is offered in chemistry, applied mathematics and psychology — human factors and community/clinical.

For more information, consult the Wichita State University Graduate Catalog.

Certificate Programs

Certificate programs in Fairmount College are available to members of the community, to students who have already earned degrees, and to students pursuing degrees in Fairmount College or other degree-granting colleges. A certificate is awarded acknowledging a student’s completion of a disciplinary or interdisciplinary focus consisting of courses which provide thematic coherence in a unique area of applied or theoretical work. Specific requirements for the following certificate programs may be reviewed in the relevant departmental sections:

  • Museum Studies — Anthropology (graduate)
  • Film Studies — English, Interdisciplinary
  • Medieval and Renaissance Studies — English, Interdisciplinary
  • Asian Studies — Interdisciplinary Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Global Competency — Interdisciplinary Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Great Plains Studies (graduate and under­graduate) — Interdisciplinary Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Tilford Diversity Studies — Interdisciplinary Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Spanish for the Professions — Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures
  • Community Psychology — Psychology
  • Human Factors Psychology — Psychology
  • Social Work and Addiction — Social Work
  • City and County Management, Economic Development, Nonprofit Management, Public Finance (graduate) — Hugo Wall School of Public Affairs

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Field Major and Bachelor of General Studies

The following Fairmount College requirements must be met in order for students to receive the Bachelor of Arts (BA), the Bachelor of Science (BS), or the Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) degrees from Fairmount College. Courses taken to fulfill these requirements also satisfy the university’s general education distribution requirements.

  1. Foundation courses — The following courses must be completed in the first 48 Fairmount College credit hours with a grade of C- or above.
    ENGL 100English Composition3
    or ENGL 101 College English I
    ENGL 102College English II3
    COMM 111Public Speaking3
    MATH 111College Algebra3
    or MATH 131 Contemporary Mathematics
  2. Upper-Division — at least 45 credit hours in courses numbered 300 or above;
  3. Residence — at least 30 hours of course credit at Wichita State. At least 24 of the last 30 credit hours or 50 of the last 60 credit hours must be completed at Wichita State;
  4. Four-year institution — a minimum of 60 credit hours must be completed in a four-year, degree-granting college or university; and
  5. D Grades — no students are allowed credit toward graduation for D grade work in excess of one-quarter of the total hours needed for the degree.

The Schedule of Courses produced each semester outlines specific courses approved in each of the following categories:

I. Fine Arts and Humanities1

Candidates for the BA, BS and BGS degrees must take 12 credit hours of courses with the following distribution:

  1. One introductory course from a fine arts discipline listed below;
  2. One introductory course from two different humanities disciplines listed below; plus
  3. An advanced further study course or an advanced issues and perspectives course in fine arts or humanities.

Fine Arts: art history, dance (history), musicology-composition, theater, other approved discipline for an advanced issues and perspectives class.

Humanities: communication (excluding foundation courses), English (excluding foundation courses), history, linguistics, modern and classical languages and literature, philosophy, religion, women’s studies, other approved discipline for an advanced issues and perspectives class.

1

A total of 24 credit hours must be taken in the fine arts/humanities and social and behavioral sciences disciplines by candidates for the BA and BGS degrees.

II. Literature

All BA, BS and BGS candidates must complete at least one course in English or foreign language literature. Inclusion of this course should be considered in general education course planning in humanities.

III. American Political System

All BA, BS and BGS candidates must demonstrate proficiency in the field of the American political system and institutions by passing either HIST 131 or HIST 132 (humanities) or POLS 121 (social sciences). Inclusion of one of these three courses should be considered in general education course planning.

IV. Social and Behavioral Sciences1

Candidates for the BA and BGS degrees must take 12 credit hours in three different departments with the following distribution:

  1. One introductory course from two different social and behavioral sciences disciplines listed below; plus
  2. An advanced further study course or an advanced issues and perspectives course in the social and behavioral sciences;
  3. One additional course may come from the student’s major or from any other elective courses within social sciences departments of the college.

Candidates for the BS degree must take a minimum of three courses (9 credit hours) following the first two distributions above. Courses within the student’s major may not apply to this university general education requirement.

Social and Behavioral Sciences: anthropology, criminal justice, economics, ethnic studies, geography, political science, psychology, social work, sociology, other approved discipline for an advanced issues and perspectives class.

Other Social and Behavioral Sciences for elective use: aging studies.

1

A total of 24 credit hours must be taken in the fine arts/humanities and social and behavioral sciences disciplines by candidates for the BA and BGS degrees.

V. Natural Sciences and Mathematics

Candidates for the BA, BS and BGS degrees who have completed at least two years of high school laboratory science classes (exclusive of general and physical science) must take a minimum of 9 credit hours of courses with the following distribution:

  1. One introductory course from two different natural sciences disciplines listed below (one of which must be a biological science and the other a physical science); plus
  2. An advanced further study course or an advanced issues and perspectives course in natural sciences.

One of the above courses must include a laboratory experience.

Candidates for the BA, BS and BGS degrees who have not completed at least two years of high school laboratory science must take 12 credit hours following the minimum distribution given above. Should a fourth course be necessary to complete the 12 credit hours, this class may come from any of the elective disciplines indicated below.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics: biology, chemistry, geology, physics or other approved discipline for an advanced issues and perspectives class.

Other Natural Sciences and Mathematics: for elective use: ANTH 101 and ANTH 106 (count as biology); GEOG 235 (counts as physical sciences).

VI. Advanced Issues and Perspectives Courses

Students must complete at least one and not more than two advanced issues and perspectives courses to fulfill university general education program requirements. In addition, courses within the student’s major discipline do not count toward university general education program requirements.

VII. Foreign Languages

Candidates for any BA degree and for the BS degree in criminal justice must demonstrate proficiency at a level equivalent to 5 hours beyond the 112 course in one foreign language or equivalent to the completion of the 112 course in two foreign languages. This proficiency may be demonstrated in the following ways:

  1. Students may successfully complete 111 and 112, plus 5 additional credit hours in one foreign language, or 111 and 112 in two foreign languages;
  2. Other foreign language experience, or high school foreign language study at the rate of one high school unit for each college semester, may apply toward the required proficiency;
  3. Students who have completed three or more years of one language in high school may fulfill the foreign language requirement by successfully completing a 3-credit-hour intermediate-level class in the same language;
  4. Students who wish to fulfill their foreign language requirement with American Sign Language may seek permission to do so by submitting a written request to the LAS exceptions committee. This request should include a justification and a list of the courses to be taken. If the committee approves the plan, a copy is put in the student’s file; and
  5. Students with English as their second language have met the college’s foreign language requirement for a baccalaureate degree.

Language 210 classes, although approved to count toward humanities requirements in the university general education program, will not fulfill a humanities course requirement for Fairmount College students. Any language course from the 220 or above level will count as general education humanities credit if on the approved list of classes published in this catalog.

Students with sufficient high school background in language study to merit placement in a Fairmount College language class beyond the 111 level may qualify for retroactive credit in language. Please see guidelines for retroactive credit outlined in the modern and classical languages and literatures departmental section of the catalog.

A student who has credit in two years of a high school foreign language may enroll in 111 and 112 for credit without departmental consent.

A student who has credit in three or more years of high school foreign language may take 111 and 112 for credit only if departmental consent has been received in writing. Otherwise, a student who has credit in three or more years of a high school foreign language may enroll in any 200-level course for credit without departmental consent.

Candidates for the BS within the division of natural sciences and mathematics have no foreign language requirement unless it is required by the department.

The BGS also has no foreign language requirement.

Enrollment in Spanish courses may require a placement exam. See individual course descriptions.

VIII. BA, BS: Major

All specific departmental major courses and requirements are listed in the catalog by department. While the department controls its own requirements for the major, the following expectations apply to all majors:

  1. A minimum 2.000 grade point average is required in the major.
  2. No more than 6 credit hours from the major may be used to satisfy the Fairmount College distribution requirements.
  3. Of the 45 credit hours of upper-division credit required for each degree, a minimum of 12 upper-division credit hours are required in the major or area of concentration.
  4. No more than 48 credit hours in the major may be used for graduation with a BA degree, and no more than 50 credit hours in the major may be used for graduation with a BS degree.
  5. A minimum of 9 hours of credit in the major discipline must be taken from Wichita State University.

IX. Combined Major

A BA degree with a combined major, consisting of 24 credit hours from one field of study and 12 credit hours from an allied field of study, may be designed with the assistance of the primary department’s academic advisor. A minimum of 12 upper-division credit hours must be included in the combined major.

X. Field Major

Students may select a major that correlates three or more fields of study to receive a broad appreciation of the cultural and dynamic factors of human conduct. The selection of courses must be made with an advisor from the primary department of interest and with the dean’s office approval. Although such a major cuts across departmental lines and is determined by the field of specific interest, the combination of courses must be acceptable to the college. Thirty-six (36) credit hours are required for the field major, with 18 credit hours in the major department and at least 9 in each of the two allied departments. Twelve (12) of the 36 credit hours must be upper-division, and the first two departments must be LAS. Students may work with an academic advisor in developing an appropriate field major or may use one of the predesigned field majors indicated below. Students must meet BA graduation requirements for all field majors except biochemistry and chemistry/business which lead to the BS degree.

For the purposes of the field major, LAS courses can include the academic majors and disciplines housed historically in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, including aging studies (AGE) (formerly gerontology), art history (ARTH), communication sciences and disorders (CSD), economics (ECON), music composition (MUSC), and theatre (THEA).

All 18 credit hours in the primary department of interest must be courses approved for the major or minor as defined for that department in the Undergraduate Catalog.

Biochemistry

Biochemistry is a rapidly growing science in which many important advances have been made in the last two decades. It requires both an understanding of biological processes and a knowledge of sophisticated techniques of chemistry and physics. The field major in biochemistry prepares students for employment or further study in this area.

Students choosing this field major should seek the advice of an advisor in the department of biological sciences or the department of chemistry as early as possible. Both the biological sciences and chemistry sections of the catalog provide complete descriptions of this major.

Chemistry/Business

See the chemistry section of the catalog for complete description.

Classical Studies

Classical studies is an interdisciplinary program designed to give students a sense of continuity and to interpret the values, ideas and ideals of antiquity as shown in its history, art, mythology, literature, political institutions and religions. The major also serves as a sound preparation for areas in which sensitivity to language and ideas is an important tool — classics, linguistics, ancient history, art history, archaeology, comparative literature, law, religion and Near Eastern studies.

The major consists of 36 credit hours which must be selected from a list of approved courses, except that courses of independent study in one of the departments of the field major may count toward the major if the subject matter is at least half classical. For further information and a list of approved courses, contact the department of modern and classical languages and literatures.

Global Studies

In recent years the world has rapidly become more closely connected and interdependent in virtually every facet of life. As a result, traditional American and Western academic perspectives alone are no longer sufficient to make sense of complex global realities. Therefore, many scholars have found it necessary to construct and include a global perspective in their teaching, and many students have sought to gain this perspective in their learning.

The global studies field major is an interdisciplinary program which allows students to pursue their course of study in a broad, complex and interconnected way, and helps them discover the area of global studies which most interests them (e.g., literature, health, business, environment). This major provides direction for those interested in pursuing a further graduate course of study or for those who will search for employment. It will also prepare students to become well-informed global citizens.

Students choosing the global studies field major will select from an approved list of courses that have a global focus. These courses are offered on the basis of two criteria: either they address their subjects from a world or global perspective, or they address geographic areas of the world outside of the United States. The major consists of 36 hours, 18 of which must be selected from a set of core courses, and the other 18 from a set of elective courses. Each student will conclude the requirements of the major by completing a final project, such as an internship or research paper, which must be approved by their advisor. Students interested in pursuing this major should contact the global studies field major advisor in the department of anthropology.

International Studies

In a rapidly globalizing world, the demand for college graduates who have a deeper understanding of different regions and cultures of the world is growing. Many employers look favorably on prospective employees with language skills and international knowledge.

The international studies field major is an interdisciplinary degree with courses required in multiple departments. Students have the option to follow an area studies track or a business administration track. Both require students to focus on a particular region of the world, including language courses for that region. The core courses for each track vary, with the area studies track focusing more on historical, political and cultural relations, and the business administration track focusing on international business courses. The international studies degree is a BA degree in Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. There is also an international studies minor available.

There are many career opportunities that can be pursued with an international studies degree including possible employment with federal and state government executive agencies, multinational corporations, law firms, international organizations such as the United Nations, nonprofit organizations and public and private schools. An international studies degree can also prepare students for a course of study in graduate school.

Students interested in pursuing a major or minor in international studies should contact the international studies advisors in the departments of political science or history, or seek additional information online.

XI. Minor

Minors are offered in all fields of study in which a major may be earned as well as in ethnic studies, geography, German, linguistics and religion. The number of hours required for a minor is set by each department. A 2.000 minimum grade point average is required in the minor. Minors from other colleges are acceptable and must meet minimum requirements of those colleges.

XII. BGS: Area of Concentration

The Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) degree allows students to design a major plan of study crossing departmental or even college lines. The BGS degree allows generalists, preprofessionals or nontraditional career students greater flexibility in planning their academic major plans.

For the purposes of the BGS major, LAS courses can include the academic majors and disciplines housed historically in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, including aging studies (AGE) (formerly gerontology), art history (ARTH), communication sciences and disorders (CSD), economics (ECON), music composition (MUSC), and theatre (THEA).

With the assistance of the advisor in the department of primary interest, each student develops a major plan of study consisting of a minimum of 33 credit hours, divided into 3 areas. The primary and secondary areas must be in LAS departments. The tertiary area may cross departmental or college lines or be thematically or occupationally related. The primary area will consist of 15 to 21 credit hours. The remaining 12 to 18 credit hours must be divided between two other departments. At least 6 credit hours must be in each of the secondary and tertiary areas. All courses used in the primary area must be courses approved for an academic major or minor as defined by that academic department in the Undergraduate Catalog. A minimum of 12 LAS upper-division credit hours must be included in the major plan.

Additional limits to the minimum hours required for the BGS degree include: no more than 30 credit hours from one department, no more than 60 credit hours in one division (humanities, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and mathematics), and no more than 30 out-of-college credit hours.

XIII. Non Liberal Arts and Sciences Courses

Students may count only 24 credit hours of non liberal arts and sciences courses toward either the BA or BS degree. Thirty (30) credit hours of non liberal arts and sciences courses may count toward the BGS degree. Any non liberal arts and sciences courses required by a major within Fairmount College will apply to LAS hours required for the degree.

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Students desiring an emphasis in applied language study through Fairmount College should see requirements and curriculum for a major in communication sciences and disorders listed in the College of Health Professions section of the catalog.

Special Preprofessional Programs

Advisors in the LASAC or in various preprofessional academic departments provide specific information regarding courses and requirements.

Prelaw

The Association of American Law Schools states that students interested in pursuing a law degree should get a broad under­graduate education that provides “comprehension and expression in words, critical understanding of the human institutions and values with which the law deals, and creative power in thinking.” These qualities are to be achieved through disciplined study in fields of the student’s choice. Requirements for the bachelor’s degree provide students with both a general education and a concentration in a major field of study.

Law school admission requires completion of a baccalaureate degree. Many majors provide appropriate foundation for the study of law. LAS academic advisors offer prelaw students assistance in contacting appropriate academic departments.

Premedical Professions — Medicine, Dentistry, Optometry, Pharmacy, Veterinary Medicine, Podiatry, Chiropractic Medicine

Academic advising for premedical professions is coordinated through the LASAC. A four-year bachelor’s degree is required for admission to medical and osteopathic schools and is strongly encouraged for other premedical professional programs. Any academic major is acceptable, as long as the degree includes the prerequisite core of courses in math and sciences. Medical and professional schools expect candidates to demonstrate the intellectual, analytical and problem-solving skills necessary to succeed in medical school. Students are strongly advised to balance coursework in the natural sciences with coursework in humanities and social sciences. The general education component of a liberal arts degree provides a sound foundation for demonstrating an interest in and knowledge of a diverse and global society. Candidates should also consider coursework in areas such as anthropology, communication, economics, ethics, logic, psychology, sociology and statistics.

Preparation for Secondary Education

A professional teaching field in foreign language Pre-K through 12 may be obtained through the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. A professional teaching field for middle and secondary school teachers is offered through the College of Education as are teaching fields in all other areas.