Honors (HNRS)

Courses numbered 100 to 299 = lower-division; 300 to 499 = upper-division; 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate.

HNRS 101.  Introduction to the University   3 credit hours

Designed especially for first-year students, with the goal of preparing students to succeed in college, including graduating in a timely fashion. Provides students with information about: college expectations; academic major, career and life planning; study skills; teaching and learning styles; respecting diversity of thought and culture; critical thinking; leadership training; campus resources; university policies and procedures; personal finances; health and fitness; and the benefits of engagement in student organizations. Students are introduced to faculty and staff from across the campus, and create an individualized graduation plan through a process of developmental advising.

HNRS 104.  Seminar I: Fine Arts   3-4 credit hours

General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: Beginning honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 104B.  Art of Theater   3 credit hours

General education introductory course. What is art? Is it a valued part of our world? Does it matter in today's world? This seminar examines what Theatre is as an art form, and explores its value in our lives. It approaches these topics through readings, discussions and attendances at performances. Actors, designers, directors in the Wichita area bring their expertise to class through presentations and talk backs. Besides readings and discussions, the course includes several experiential opportunities outside of the classroom. Creative projects for the class are also a strong component.

HNRS 105.  Seminar I: Humanities   3-4 credit hours

General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: Beginning honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 105G.  War: Strategic Studies   3 credit hours

General education introductory course. Conflict and warfare are about as "normal" as anything in human affairs. Many of us find this shameful and disgusting and like to think of warfare as aberrant. Many of the same people who feel this way admire and respect soldiers, are stirred by military displays, and spend hours each week playing combat-based video games (or chess). In this season when "outsider" presidential candidates are drawing a lot of interest, it's worth remembering that the only political "outsiders" ever elected President (or nominated by a major party) were generals: Washington, Jackson, Taylor, Grant, Garfield, Eisenhower, and losing nominees Scott and Hancock, and several other Presidents got their start in politics based on military reputations, e.g., Monroe, Pierce, Hayes, and T. Roosevelt. This is not entirely surprising if you remember that executive power in politics is a direct descendant of leadership in war. This seminar is not about whether war is a good thing, a bad thing, or a necessary evil. It is about how it works. At the center of this theme lies the concept of strategy. Effective strategic thinking is one of the highest level forms of applied intelligence. It requires a synoptic grasp of many variables and is inherently "interactive"--great commanders know how to get inside the heads of their enemies. War is perhaps the most demanding field in which strategic thinking is employed, but not the only one. Almost all the great students of strategy approach it historically and so will we.

HNRS 105V.  Environmental Philosophy   3 credit hours

General education introductory course.

HNRS 105W.  Epidemics in World History   3 credit hours

General education introductory course.

HNRS 106.  Seminar I: Social and Behavioral Sciences   3-4 credit hours

General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: Beginning honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 107.  Seminar I: Mathematics and Natural Sciences   1-5 credit hours

1-3 Classroom hours; 2-4 Lab hours. General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: beginning honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 150.  Seminar II: Fine Arts   3-4 credit hours

General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 151.  Seminar II: Humanities   3-4 credit hours

General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 152.  Seminar II: Social and Behavioral Sciences   3-4 credit hours

General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 152F.  Leadership Challenge   3 credit hours

General education introductory course. Course takes the perspective of Astin and Astin (2000) that… “an important leadership development challenge for higher education is to empower students, by helping them develop those special talents and attitudes that will enable them to become effective social change agents.” Considering the pace of change in society, leadership may be our most significant challenge in the 21st century. Course embraces adaptive challenges and create conditions for students to exercise leadership in real time. This is not a traditionally-taught class. Uses experiential methods so that the classroom serves as a learning laboratory for leadership development. In the end, this experience is about developing the capacity to serve as effective social change agents.

HNRS 153.  Seminar II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences   3-5 credit hours

1-3 Classroom hours; 2-4 Lab hours. General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 153B.  The Dynamic Universe   3 credit hours

General education introductory course. Designed to introduce students to the fascinating subject of astronomy. Focuses heavily on current space missions and astronomical events. Covers a variety of topics, including the solar system, the sun, the stars, stellar evolution (birth, life, and death of stars), galaxies and cosmology (the origin and fate of the universe).

HNRS 153T.  Big Bang, Black Holes, the Fate of the Universe   3 credit hours

General education introductory course. Nonmathematical introduction to the theory of the Big Bang. Examines the history of the universe from its beginning through the most recent spacecraft missions. Students learn concepts that tie many different subjects together, contributing a valuable piece to their comprehensive education.

HNRS 300.  Introduction to the University for Transfer Students   1-2 credit hours

Designed especially for students who have recently transferred to WSU from another institution, with the goal of preparing students to succeed, including graduating in a timely fashion. Provides students with information about: expectations of WSU professors; academic major, career and life planning; study skills; teaching and learning styles; respecting diversity of thought and culture; critical thinking; leadership training; campus resources; university policies and procedures; personal finances; health and fitness; and the benefits of engagement in student organizations. Students are introduced to faculty and staff from across the campus, and create an individualized graduation plan through a process of developmental advising.

HNRS 304.  Seminar III: Fine Arts   3-4 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 304E.  The Arts in Wichita   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Hybrid course (part of the course interaction is online) looks at the role of the arts (music, dance, art and theatre) in the Wichita community. Explores the role of the audience and patronage, the impact of the arts in the local community, arts management and marketing by meeting at various art events or venues in Wichita and meeting with local arts managers and artists in class. Because this is a hybrid course, part of it is delivered online. Students are expected to participate in discussion forums and online activities to earn full credit.

HNRS 304F.  Discovering Creativity   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. This course is based on the concept that all humans are creative beings who are involved in the creative process. We will explore this concept through creative exercises inspired by our core text, Discovering the Creative Impulse by Harold Popp. Students will review creative processes and products with an eye to the uniqueness of human needs, drives, and activities. Diverse perspectives are integral to the creative endeavor not only in art and in science, but across disciplines, cultures, and ages and experiences.

HNRS 305.  Seminar III: Humanities   3-4 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 305D.  Models and Analogies in the Natural and Social Sciences   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course.

HNRS 305E.  Video Games and Philosophy   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Uses video games from their earliest days to the present as a launching pad for discussion of a host of mind-bending philosophical issues in ethics, metaphysics, epistemology and logic. The coverage of specific video games and philosophical topics are determined in part by student interest and may include such questions as: What is the value in playing video games? Can you do something “morally wrong” in the context of a video game, or does anything go? Is killing in a video game bad for your moral character in real life? Is time travel really possible? Could an artificial intelligence really exist? Is faster-than-light travel possible? Is teleportation really possible (and desirable)? Video games sometimes involve supernatural beings, magic and other occult ideas — what can be learned about the philosophy of religion from such games? What kinds of beings do (or could) count as “persons” in the strict sense? Where is the line between simulation and reality? How do we know we aren’t characters in a video game right now? What, if anything, do game-theoretical concepts such as The Prisoner’s Dilemma teach about real decision making? Why are video games predominantly played by males? Is it okay that your Kinnect is watching you? Who “owns” extremely popular games — the players or the creators? In addition to the main focus on video games themselves, students discuss some books and movies that touch on related issues: The Last Starfighter, Tron, Ender’s Game, The Matrix, Lara Croft, Star Trek, and more. Grades are based on several shorter plus one longer written assignment, a group project and related in-class presentation, and class participation.

HNRS 305F.  Epidemics in World History   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Focuses on the history of the impacts and human responses to a specific epidemic outbreak or outbreaks. Begins with an overview of epidemics and human response and focuses in depth on legionella and Legionnaires’ disease. This examination situates current events into the history of the bacteria and traces the public health, scientific and popular responses to the infectious organism. Course is conducted seminar style with student discussion and participation forming a portion of the grade. Students are also graded on both a written project and an oral presentation of their research. If enrollment merits, the final research project may be a collaborative effort. Course objective is to get the students digging into the history of Legionnaires’ disease and applying a critical eye to contemporary events and approaches to the disease.

HNRS 305G.  Governing Women's Bodies in the 20th Century   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Examines the legal, medical, and media-driven cultural attempts to govern women’s bodies throughout the 20th century in the United States. Historically marginalized, American women often found the battle to secure greater legal rights; access to political, economic, and social power; and ability to make basic choices about their lives centered on a fight to control their bodies. Course covers such topics as property and wage rights, suffrage and legal access, medical authority and consent, as well as the television and movie images of the female ideal that attempt to govern women’s bodies in the 20th century and shape the way contemporary Americans think about women today.

HNRS 305I.  Science, Religion & Philosophy   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Scientific inquiry and religious belief have a complicated, intertwined history. One influential view argues that religion partly inspired the rise of science and certainly the church often supported it. But some of the most dramatic and defining moments in modern history center on science-religion conflict, and many secularists and religious define the modern era as the age of anti-religion secularism. This seminar explores the relation of science and religion through case studies of some of the most dramatic conflicts and debates seemingly pitting them against one another. The primary case studies are the famous trial of Galileo by the Inquisition in the 1630s, and the reception of Darwin’s theory of evolution in the later 19th century. Also examines cosmology and debates about the origins of the universe. In each case, students study the conflicting views in their own terms before considering how disputes between them can best be understood and perhaps resolved. Students do several mini-research projects to develop information on each topic. Students stage debates, mock trials, etc., to focus and sharpen the points of conflict. One outcome is guaranteed: what everyone thinks they “know” about these famous conflicts and debates is, in fact, often false or badly distorted.

HNRS 305J.  Minds and Machines   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. People have constructed machines designed to imitate living creatures in some way long before there were electronic computers. When is a machine’s behavior appropriately called "intelligent?" Must it be capable of using a language? Must a machine be capable of learning in order to be regarded as intelligent? Must it be able to communicate with humans? What criteria are appropriate for judging that an animal's behavior is intelligent; should the same criteria be used for machine intelligence? What lessons about machine intelligence should we take from debates over recent studies of intelligence in animals with nervous systems very different from humans (e.g., corvids, cephalopods)? Students consider these and other, related questions. Course takes a historical and interdisciplinary approach, drawing on works in philosophy, literature, science and history of science.

HNRS 305K.  The Rise and Fall of Athens   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Who were the men and women of Athens, what were they like and how did they see themselves? Students read Homer's Odyssey and parts of the Iliad (how they saw themselves), then track the Athenians as a developing sea power (the Rise), an empire, and then a city conquered by plague, constant war, politics, and the scarcity of wheat (the Fall). Students also try seeing Athens from other angles: Plutarch's Lives (of famous Greeks) for example, and Mary Renault's historical novels. Students investigate the Spartans, a contrasting culture and always a potential enemy of Athens. They read Brian Doerries's recent The Theater of War. He uses Greek plays (in readers' theater) to help returning veterans confront their memories. The Greeks, too, fought a very long war; their plays are full of it. Students read some of them, too, and then look at Barry Posen's Restraint (2015). He proposes for the U.S. military a grand strategy of sea power, the same strategy Perikles designed for Athens. Students finish the course with a brief look at Philip, then Alexander of Macedon, who subdued both Sparta and Athens, then united the Greeks in a years-long conquest of Persia that spread Hellenism as far as India. Great powers rise, then fall. What that entails is what this course is about.

HNRS 305M.  Science Fiction and Human Destiny   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Science fiction is chameleon-like. Although a well-defined niche in publishing, no standard definition captures its variety and scope. Even science can be an afterthought in mainstream works of science fiction. The audience for it tends to be male, but many of the most admired and successful writers in the field are women. Some classic science fiction fits narrow stereotypes ("scientists save the world," or "mad scientist threatens the world"), while other classics explode those same stereotypes. All of this, coupled with the genre's popularity, says something about where our imaginations live in the 21st century. Seminar examines a wide range of contemporary science fiction — novels, stories and films — with a view to both the methods and ideas that make science fiction what it is. Is science fiction prophetic, or more a mirror for our contemporary hopes and fears? Is it escapist literature, or a special kind of "realistic" fiction? Assignments include interpretative essays and a semester project: the creation of an invented world that could be a setting for science fiction stories.

HNRS 305P.  Epics and Identities: The Emergence of European Nationhood   3 credit hours

In this seminar we will see what some early western European long poems can tell us about social justice, cultural patterns and world views. Epics are core expressions of national identities. Heroes, acting or reacting in difficult situations, model social behavior within a matrix of communal values. Tribes, bands, armies, towns and kingdoms demonstrate the need, indeed the hunger for justice guided by cultural goals and taboos. Each poem is finally an expression of nationhood, the common view of self and others acquired by dealing with adversity over time within a particular historical context.

HNRS 306.  Seminar III: Social and Behavioral Sciences   3-4 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 306B.  Social Problems and Solutions   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Students identify a social problem, assess why it is not being solved currently by public or private action, and then propose a solution. The definition of “social problem” is expansive, and can include issues of health, the environment, infrastructure, economics, applied science or technology, and the arts. Course begins with analysis of the contemporary politics of health insurance reform and immigration, but most student work consists of a self-directed social solution project. Examples of possible topics: FAA regulations and airline safety, global warming, support/lack of support for basic science research, arts education in schools, child and adult illiteracy.

HNRS 306C.  The Art of Criminal Investigation   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Introduces students to the philosophical principles underlying criminal investigation, as opposed to the procedures. Students learn the basics about crime and investigation, but the emphasis is on applying the principles to daily life. Critical thinking is required to examine the difference between evidence and personal belief. Students are challenged to justify their beliefs when confronted with conflicting evidence. Instead of investigating a crime, students investigate social issues with the detective mentality.

HNRS 306D.  Law and Public Policy   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. The required introductory course for the Honors Law and Public Policy track. Focuses on how law and politics shapes the lives of citizens. Subjects covered include criminal law, drug courts, race and incarceration, free speech, freedom of religion, and judicial politics. Students complete a collaborative research project with the instructor. While this course may be of interest to students interested in going to law school, it is designed for all Honors students who are interested in how people organize their political and social lives through the law.

HNRS 306E.  Hunger in NYC: Service and Leadership Needed   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Student Involvement’s Alternative Spring Break program exposes WSU students to complex social and cultural issues through community visits and direct service. This experiential course uses an applied learning method of service-learning to explore food and shelter insecurities in New York City. Students travel to NYC during spring break to serve a variety of community-based organizations with the goal of fighting hunger and homelessness. Class explores social justice issues related to service through readings, discussion, writing, reorientation service in Wichita and research-based reflection.

HNRS 306F.  Media Innovation, and Entrepreneurship   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. It is the early stage of an information revolution. In the course of an 18-year-old’s lifetime, communications has become increasingly social, mobile, visual and global. This course is intended to expand students’ knowledge about how digital communication and entrepreneurship have transformed society, business and lives. It is meant to inspire thinking about innovation, and what roles students may play in the future of communication. The course contributes to their media and business literacy. It may even launch them on a new path in their lives and careers. Uses reading, research, class discussion, guest speakers and blogs to broaden their understanding of what it all means to those in communication careers. Students complete a digital entrepreneurship project to conceptualize and present a website, blog, game or app they pitch to potential investors.

HNRS 306G.  Alternative Break: Service Leadership   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Student Involvement's Alternative Spring Break program exposes WSU students to complex social and cultural issues through community visits and direct service. This experiential course uses an applied learning method of service-learning to explore a social justice issue through multiple communities both local and in an immersive travel environment. Students travel during spring break to serve in a variety of community based organizations. Course explores social justice issues related to service through readings, discussion, writing, reorientation service in Wichita and research-based reflection. Open to all students by application to Student Involvement.

HNRS 307.  Seminar III: Mathematics and Natural Sciences   3-4 credit hours

1-3 Classroom hours; 2-4 Lab hours. General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 310.  Honors Tutorial   1-2 credit hours

Repeatable to a maximum of 3 hours of credit. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 310Q.  Honors Tutorial - Engaging Leaders   1 credit hour

Offers students the unique opportunity to explore, discuss and analyze various professional fields directed by executive officials from different companies, corporations and industries throughout the Wichita area. Introduces participants to those leadership and transferable skills that rising leaders should possess and consider when choosing a career path. Provides for visits to various city facilities, exposure to different philosophies and styles of leadership, and gives participants a chance to assemble facts, evaluate options and become more comfortable with the transition from the classroom to the boardroom. Course can be used toward the undergraduate leadership certificate, which corresponds to the following leadership certificate outcomes: identify leadership theories and concepts; differentiate leadership practices across settings, organizations, disciplines and systems; develop leadership skills based on personal strengths and professional interests.

HNRS 310R.  Honors Tutorial - Evolving Leaders   1 credit hour

Designed for returning students to WSU who are looking to expand upon their leadership skills and abilities. Program focuses on creating well balanced leaders. Each participant receives a copy of The Well-Balanced Leader by Ron Roberts and is placed in a small group to present a chapter from the book. Each participant also helps plan the Leadership Discovery Summit, a half-day leadership workshop open to any WSU student. Course can be used toward the undergraduate leadership certificate, which corresponds to the following leadership certificate outcomes: identify leadership theories and concepts; differentiate leadership practices across settings, organizations, disciplines and systems; develop leadership skills based on personal strengths and professional interests.

HNRS 310S.  Honors Tutorial - Emerging Leaders   1 credit hour

Unique opportunity for WSU students to get on the fast-track to student leadership, campus, and community involvement. Participants have an opportunity to develop their leadership abilities through workshops, activities and reflection in order to prepare them for future leadership experience at WSU and beyond. Each participant is paired up with an upperclassman mentor. These mentors are trained by Student Involvement to develop leadership potential on a peer level. They operate as a campus and community resource for their mentees as well as being an observable example of the qualities, character and actions of a student leader. Course can be used toward the undergraduate leadership certificate, which corresponds to the following leadership certificate outcomes: identify leadership theories and concepts; differentiate leadership practices across settings, organizations, disciplines and systems; develop leadership skills based on personal strengths and professional interests.

HNRS 310T.  Summer Leadership Institute   1 credit hour

A 5-day experience that allows each participant to evolve and expand upon leadership skills and abilities. Whether experienced or a novice leader, each individual is guided to develop and reflect upon where they currently are and where they would like to be as a leader. Participants are divided into leadership squads throughout the institute where they have the opportunity to discuss, analyze, and reflect upon the leadership lessons taught. Participants of SLI are guided to apply principles of leadership, develop self-awareness and teambuilding skills, and engage in critical thinking to address real-world leadership challenges.

HNRS 351.  Survey of Leadership   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. The main leadership theories and a history of leadership thought are presented, leadership perspectives are debated, and examples of leadership in various contexts are discussed. After completing the seminar students should be able to recognize the main leadership theories, identify different leadership perspectives, recognize applications of leadership, and understand the benefits and challenges of leadership.

HNRS 352.  Survey of Law & Public Policy   3 credit hours

General education advanced issues and perspectives course. Interdisciplinary introduction to the role of law and public policy in the public and private sectors. Course provides a basic framework for understanding the differing rationale and methods associated with developing laws and public policies, and explores the impact of the political and social environment on the development, interpretation and application of both public policy and law.

HNRS 385.  Advanced Academic Writing   3 credit hours

Course goal is to make honors students excellent academic writers. Going well beyond ENGL 101 and 102, attention is paid to topic selection, thesis construction and refinement, the use of supporting evidence, the evaluation of sources, organizing an argument, appropriate diction, and the conventions of various forms of academic writing (from bibliographies and exam answers to research papers and honors theses). Students develop grammatical competence and hone their abilities to express complex ideas clearly, concisely and precisely. Heavy emphasis on learning by doing, including intense feedback and revision processes. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 398.  Travel Seminar   1-4 credit hours

Interdisciplinary travel seminar which allows a student travelling abroad to gain credit for the study of culture, art, literature, architecture, political, social, scientific and economic conditions while visiting historic places of interest. Students may enroll under the direction of the dean of the Cohen Honors College, a faculty member in any department, or as part of a travel experience organized through the Cohen Honors College. Prerequisite: permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 398A.  Travel Seminar: Turkey and Greece   1-3 credit hours

Interdisciplinary travel seminar which allows a student travelling abroad to gain credit for the study of culture, art, literature, architecture, political, social, scientific and economic conditions while visiting historic places of interest. Students may enroll under the direction of the dean of the Cohen Honors College, a faculty member in any department, or as part of a travel experience organized through the Cohen Honors College. Prerequisite: permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 398B.  Travel Seminar: Europe   3 credit hours

Interdisciplinary travel seminar which allows a student travelling abroad to gain credit for the study of culture, art, literature, architecture, political, social, scientific and economic conditions while visiting historic places of interest. Students may enroll under the direction of the dean of the Cohen Honors College, a faculty member in any department, or as part of a travel experience organized through the Cohen Honors College. Prerequisite: permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 398C.  Alternative Break: Africa   1-3 credit hours

Student Involvement’s Alternative Summer Break program exposes WSU students to complex social and cultural issues through community visits and direct service. Experiential course uses an applied learning method of service-learning to explore communities in developing rural Africa. Students travel to Africa during summer break to serve with community building through youth education and capacity building. Class explores social justice issues related to service through readings, discussion, writing, reorientation service in Wichita and research-based reflection.

HNRS 398E.  Alt Break D.C.   3 credit hours

Experiential course uses an applied learning method of service-learning to explore a social justice issue or issues. Students travel during spring break to Washington D.C. to serve in a variety of community-based organizations. Students explore social justice issues related to service through readings, discussion, writing, reorientation service in Wichita and research-based reflection.

HNRS 404.  Seminar in Fine Arts   3-4 credit hours

General education advanced further study course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 405.  Seminar in Humanities   3-4 credit hours

General education advanced further study course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 405B.  Isms & Ologies: Choose Your Own Adventure   3 credit hours

General education advanced further study course. Nuclear physics! The history of burlesque! What 18th century recipe books have to say about cultural standards! Gothic cathedrals! Worldwide creation myths! Rembrandt's experience with autopsies! This course is based on the notion that a loving study of serious literature, which often takes place purely within the boundaries of academic literary criticism, can also properly touch upon the larger world, the "isms" and "ologies" of other fields of interest. Students choose a body of serious literary writing for which they've always felt passion (poetry or prose, canonical or contemporary, the choice is the student’s) and then choose an outside field of interest (medicine, world religions, crime forensics, whatever: again, the choice is the student’s) that links up meaningfully with the literature. In many senses, this is truly a course of the student’s own making, and implies as its constituency exactly that kind of proactive, self-directed person one associates with Honors College study. The end-game moment is be a final, substantial paper based upon the students’ semester of intense and engaged research, class presentations that summarize the papers… hopefully, this results in a series of classes toward semester’s end as various and bountiful and substantial and fun as a WSU classroom can afford to contain.

HNRS 405C.  Nature of Fiction: Writing the Real   3 credit hours

General education advanced further study course. Since the 1960s, new and different interpretive methods for studying and analyzing literary works have emerged, one after another. Text-based formalism ruled for years, but then the idea of reading a piece of literature as history took hold. Readers as generators of meaning followed, varying by education and experience. Class, race, gender, sexual preference then offered ways of seeing literature so that texts both old and new were given multiple access points. Honors ENGL 330 reviews these critical schools of thought, providing multiple lenses for those who wish to examine and re-examine literature.

HNRS 405D.  Race, Racism, Social Justice   3 credit hours

General education advanced further study course. Explores the many connections between race, racism and social justice. What is race? Is it a natural-biological category, or something that we as a society construct? What is racism? Course examines the related psychological phenomena of racial prejudice, white privilege, and implicit racial bias, especially as these phenomena impact discussions of social justice. What is social justice? Course addresses this question while paying especially close attention to current social justice movements in American urban communities, such as the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

HNRS 406.  Seminar in Social and Behavioral Sciences   3-4 credit hours

General education advanced further study course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission from the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 406A.  What a Difference a Nonprofit Makes   3 credit hours

Hands-on opportunity to explore a nonprofit arts, health, human service, education or advocacy organization. Students engage in real world problem-solving from the perspective of a nonprofit organization. An introduction to the nonprofit sector for those interested in starting a nonprofit or working in a nonprofit, the course covers: people and programs that make up a nonprofit; history of the nonprofit sector; history of philanthropy; nonprofit organizations as mediating institutions; how public policy shapes the nonprofit sector. Draws on the experience of an instructor who has worked with nonprofits for over 20 years as well as guest speakers from leading nonprofit organizations. Prepares students considering an internship or cooperative education experience in a nonprofit.

HNRS 407.  Seminar in Mathematics and Natural Sciences   3-4 credit hours

General education advanced further study course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: honors student or permission from the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 410.  Independent Study   1-4 credit hours

Repeatable to a maximum of 6 hours of credit. Prerequisite: permission from Honors College.

HNRS 481.  Cooperative Education   1-4 credit hours

Complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisite: consent of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 481N.  Cooperative Education: Internship   1-4 credit hours

Complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment as an intern. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisite: consent of the Cohen Honors College.

HNRS 485.  Honors Research Seminar   3-4 credit hours

Students who complete this course have a basic understanding of the scientific process, human subject research and research ethics, exposure to research questions and practices in a variety of disciplines, and experience formulating a research question, strategizing an appropriate methodology, prose style and editing, document design, abstracts, and potentially conducting preliminary research. Emphasis is placed on the reading and evaluation of research literature with the goal of developing the skills for writing a research proposal. Students are educated on how to identify and approach a faculty mentor. Guest lecturers from various academic disciplines including the libraries may be invited to present. Students are strongly encouraged throughout and particularly toward the end of their experience to work with their faculty mentor to continue their research and develop a publication or conference presentation. Because the course enrolls from different disciplines, students also become acquainted with research topics and arguments outside their fields of study. Course is meant to supplement, not replace, the research methods course found in many disciplines.