ME - Mechanical Engineering

Courses numbered 100 to 299 = lower-division; 300 to 499 = upper-division; 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate.

ME 250.  Materials Engineering   (3).

Introduces the basic principles behind materials science and engineering. Structure and properties of materials relevant to practicing engineers are looked at along with crystal structure and imperfections in metals. Studies diffusion mechanical properties, failure mechanisms, phase equilibrium diagrams and heat treatment principles for steels, cast irons, and other metal alloys. Provides the scientific foundation for an understanding of the relationships among material properties, structure and performance for the classes of engineering solids (metals and alloys, polymers, ceramics, semiconductors, etc.). Includes study of corrosion, atomic structure, mechanical properties, failure theories, fatigue, creep, cold working, heat treating, alloying, and nondestructive and other material testing. Students are expected to gain an understanding of these materials, processing techniques, their properties, and how they are applied in the industry. Prerequisites: CHEM 211, MATH 242.

ME 251.  Materials Engineering Laboratory   (1).

Experimental study and macroscopic mechanical response of ceramics, metals, polymers and composite materials, with an introduction to the underlying microstructural processes during deformation and fracture. The laboratory is designed to introduce students to some of the most common materials testing and characterization methods. Topics include optical metallography, tensile and compression testing, hardness testing, impact testing, fatigue testing, heat treating, scanning electron microscopy, plastic injection molding, melting and casting. Corequisite: ME 250.

ME 281I.  Noncredit Internship   (0).

Complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment as an intern. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

ME 320BA.  Badge: Linear Systems for Engineers   (0.5).

Provides the essential knowledge of linear systems, aimed at understanding, analyzing and designing various mechanical engineering systems. Students learn matrix definition, build, property and operation as basic engineering mathematical tools, and their practical applications to various mechanical engineering systems. May be "stacked" with ME 320BB, 320BC, 320BD, 320BE and 320BF for ME 325 credit. Graded Bg/NBg. Prerequisite: students must possess basic math skills in algebra before enrolling.

ME 320BB.  Badge: Computer Programming for Engineers   (0.5).

Provides basic computer programming skills using a user-friendly programing language, i.e., MATLAB. Students learn practical skills such as developing computer codes to numerically solve engineering problems. Includes data types, flow control, functions, plotting, simulation and numerical methods. May be "stacked" with ME 320BA, 320BC, 320BD, 320BE and 320BF for ME 325 credit. Graded Bg/NBg. Prerequisite: students must possess basic numerical analysis and interpreting skills before enrolling.

ME 320BC.  Badge: Numerical Analysis for Engineers   (0.5).

Provides the principles of evaluating numerical differentiation, integration, and interpolation. Students also practice how to estimate the numerical accuracy using relative error. May be "stacked" with ME 320BA, 320BB, 320BD, 320BE and 320BF for ME 325 credit. Graded Bg/NBg. Prerequisites: students must possess basic math skills in algebra and calculus, and a basic understanding of Newton’s second law before enrolling.

ME 320BD.  Badge: Root Finding for Engineers   (0.5).

Provides the basic principle of root finding method (solving nonlinear equations) to solve various mechanical engineering problems. Students practice how to implement the mathematical principles into user-friendly computer code, i.e., MATLAB, to numerically solve nonlinear equations. May be "stacked" with ME 320BA, 320BB, 320BC, 320BE and 320BF for ME 325 credit. Graded Bg/NBg. Prerequisites: students must possess basic math skills in algebra and calculus, and elementary computer programming skills before enrolling.

ME 320BE.  Badge: Optimization for Engineers   (0.5).

Provides the basic principles of optimization and practices to optimally design mechanical engineering systems. Students learn how to implement the mathematical principles into user-friendly computer code, i.e., MATLAB, to numerically determine optimal engineering solutions. May be "stacked" with ME 320BA, 320BB, 320BC, 320BD and 320BF for ME 325 credit. Graded Bg/NBg. Prerequisites: students must possess basic math skills in algebra and calculus, and rudimentary computer programming skills before enrolling.

ME 320BF.  Badge: Numerical Differential Equations for Engineers   (0.5).

Provides the basic principles of solving differential equations using numerical methods to solve various mechanical engineering problems. Students practice how to implement the mathematical principles into user-friendly computer code, i.e., MATLAB, to numerically solve differential equations. May be "stacked" with ME 320BA, 320BB, 320BC, 320BD and 320BE for ME 325 credit. Graded Bg/NBg. Prerequisites: students must possess basic math skills in algebra and calculus, and elementary understanding of Newton’s second law and physical properties such as temperature, pressure, displacement, velocity and acceleration before enrolling.

ME 325.  Numerical Methods for Engineers   (3).

Provides the basic numerical methods to understand, analyze and design the various engineering systems. Includes linear systems of equations, least square problems, eigenvalue problems, and singular value problems, and ordinary differential equations. Students learn not only basic principles of numerical analysis, but also practical applications to the various numerical problems through commercially available computer software, e.g., MS Excel and MATLAB. Prerequisites: MATH 243 and PHYS 313.

ME 335.  Dynamics for Mechanical Engineers   (3).

Kinematics and kinetics of particles in space and rigid bodies in plane motion. Applications of the principles of Newton's laws, work-energy, impulse-momentum, and conservation laws to solve mechanical systems with prismatic joints, revolute joints, cylindrical joints, and rolling joints. Lectures and projects on modeling and simulation of mechanical systems using multibody dynamic software. Prerequisites: AE 223 and MATH 344.

ME 339.  Design of Machinery   (3).

Introduces engineering design process; synthesis and analysis of machinery and machines. Kinematic (position, velocity and acceleration) and inverse dynamic analysis of planar mechanisms by analytical, graphical and computer methods. Design of linkages for motion, path and function generation; cam design. Computer-aided engineering approach in mechanical design; projects on practical engineering designs for machinery. Prerequisite: IME 222. Corequisite: ME 335.

ME 360.  Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering   (1-3).

New or special topics presented on sufficient demand. Repeatable for credit when subject material warrants. Prerequisites: as published or departmental consent.

ME 398.  Thermodynamics I   (3).

An introduction to the terminology and analysis techniques specific to thermodynamics centered around a study of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Prerequisites: MATH 243, PHYS 313.

ME 398H.  Thermodynamics I - Honors   (3).

An introduction to the terminology and analysis techniques specific to thermodynamics centered around a study of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Honors section. Prerequisites: MATH 243, PHYS 313.

ME 439.  Mechanical Engineering Design I   (3).

Principles of mechanical design, emphasizing practice in the application of many mechanical design elements: shafts, bearings, gears, brakes, clutches, thread fasteners, etc. Includes machine elements design, materials election, fatigue, stress concentration, statistical concepts and cost standardization. Innovative practical applications demanding integration of machine elements into a practical device. Prerequisites: ME 250, ME 251, AE 333, MATH 555.

ME 450.  Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering   (1-3).

New or special topics presented on sufficient demand. Repeatable for credit when subject material warrants. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

ME 469.  Energy Conversion   (3).

Energy conversion principles and their implementation in engineering devices including thermal, mechanical, nuclear and direct energy conversion processes. Prerequisite: ME 398.

ME 481A.  Cooperative Education   (1-3).

Introduction to engineering practice by working in industry in an engineering-related job. Provides planned professional experience designed to complement and enhance the student's academic program. Individualized programs must be formulated in consultation with, and approved by, appropriate faculty sponsors and cooperative education coordinators. Intended for students who will be working full time on their co-op assignments and need not be enrolled in any other course. May be repeated. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisites: junior standing and approval by the appropriate faculty sponsor.

ME 481I.  Noncredit Internship   (0).

Complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment as an intern. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

ME 481N.  Internship   (1).

Complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment as an intern. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

ME 481P.  Cooperative Education   (1).

Introduction to engineering practice by working in industry in an engineering-related job. Provides planned professional experience designed to complement and enhance the student's academic program. Individualized programs must be formulated in consultation with, and approved by, appropriate faculty sponsors and cooperative education coordinators. Intended for students who will be working part time on their co-op assignments and be currently enrolled in courses leading to a mechanical engineering degree. May be repeated. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisites: junior standing and approval by the appropriate faculty sponsor.

ME 502.  Thermodynamics II   (3).

Continuation of ME 398, emphasizing cycle analysis, thermodynamic property relationships and psychrometrics, with an introduction to combustion processes and chemical thermodynamics. For undergraduate students only. Prerequisite: ME 398.

ME 521.  Fluid Mechanics   (3).

The definition of a fluid and the concept of a continuum. Stress and strain in a Newtonian fluid. Description and classification of fluid motions. Hydrostatic pressure and forces on submerged surfaces. Reynolds Transport Theorem and integral analysis of conservation laws. Introduction to differential analysis of fluid motion. Dimensional analysis and similitude. Study of flow in closed conduits: pressure drop in fully developed viscous flow. The boundary layer concept and lift and drag forces on immersed bodies. For undergraduate students only. Prerequisites: ME 335, 398, MATH 555; all with a minimum grade of C (2.000).

ME 522.  Heat Transfer   (3).

Introduction to the three modes of heat transfer in the context of the laws of thermodynamics; the heat equation and its application to steady conduction in one- and two-dimensions as well as to unsteady one-dimensional conduction; the thermal boundary layer, Reynolds Analogy, and the problem of convection; free and forced convection in internal and external flows; boiling and condensation; thermal radiation. Emphasizes problem solving using analytical methods approximate solutions, analogies, empirical correlations, and numerical methods. For undergraduate students only. Prerequisites: ME 325, ME 521 and PHYS 314; each with a minimum grade of C (2.000).

ME 533.  Mechanical Engineering Laboratory   (3).

2 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. Introduces the basics of engineering measurements. Discusses related theory, followed by applications in such areas as strain, sound, temperature and pressure measurements. Format includes lectures, recitation (presenting the concept of the experiment to be performed and the required data analysis), and laboratories. Analyzes the data obtained from measuring systems set up and operated in the laboratory to demonstrate and reinforce fundamental concepts of engineering mechanics. For undergraduate students only. Prerequisites: EE 282, AE 333, ME 325, ENGL 102, COMM 111, PHYS 315; Corequisite: ME 522.

ME 541.  Mechanical Engineering Design II   (3).

Applications of engineering design principles to the creative design of mechanical equipment. Problem definition, conceptual design, feasibility studies, design calculations to obtain creative solutions for current real engineering problems. Introduction to human factors, economics and reliability theory. Group and individual design projects. For undergraduate students only. Prerequisites: ME 339 and ME 439.

ME 581.  Introduction to Corrosion   (3).

Presents information about basic corrosion processes, underlying principles of corrosion formations, and general protection methods. Studies basic corrosion and corrosion mechanisms, importance of corrosion, coating systems, and how the materials are protected from the corrosion formations. Concerns fundamental theory of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the corrosion process of metals and alloys as well as polymer materials both in atmosphere and water solutions. Focuses on electrochemical aspects and the influences of the properties of the metals and their oxides on the corrosion behavior, which is exemplified by different corrosion types. Existing corrosion protection strategies, including surface treatments and coatings are described and choice of material is discussed from a corrosion point of view. Prerequisites: ME 250 and ME 398; or instructor’s consent.

ME 602.  Engineering for the Environment   (3).

Engineering for the environment, air, water and noise pollution, and handling of hazardous wastes. Covers briefly the main pollutants, their major sources, their effects and their attainment levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Emphasizes engineering systems for pollution control. Prerequisites: ME 398, AE 223, IME 255, or departmental consent.

ME 633.  Mechanical Engineering Systems Laboratory   (3).

2 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. Selected experiments illustrate the methodology of experimentation as applied to mechanical and thermal systems. Experiments include the measurement of performance of typical systems and evaluation of physical properties and parameters of systems. Group design and construction of an experiment is an important part of the course. Team and individual efforts are stressed as are written and oral communication skills. For undergraduate students only. Prerequisites: ME 522, ME 533.

ME 637.  Computer-Aided Engineering   (3).

2 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. Integrates computer-aided design, finite element analysis, kinematics analysis, heat transfer analysis and other considerations for design of mechanical components and systems. Provides a blend of theory and practice. Prerequisites: ME 339 and ME 439, or equivalent.

ME 639.  Applications of Finite Element Methods in Mechanical Engineering   (3).

2 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. Introduces the finite element method (FEM) as a powerful and general tool for solving differential equations arising from modeling practical engineering problems. Finite element solutions to one- and two-dimensional mechanical engineering problems in mechanical systems, heat transfer, fluid mechanics and vibrations. Includes Galerkin's and variational finite element models. Introduces commercial finite element computer tools such as ANSYS. Prerequisites: ME 325, ME 339 and ME 439; Corequisite: ME 522 or instructor's consent.

ME 644.  Design of HVAC Systems   (3).

Analysis and design of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems based on psychometrics, thermodynamics and heat transfer fundamentals with focus on advanced duct design for composite building, cooling load calculations and thermal-issues based psychometric. Focuses on design procedures for space air-conditioning, and heating and cooling loads in buildings. Prerequisites: ME 521, 522; or instructor's consent.

ME 650.  Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering   (1-3).

New or special topics are presented on sufficient demand. Repeatable for credit when subject material warrants. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

ME 651.  Biomaterials   (3).

Introduction to biomaterials and biotechnology for both undergraduate and graduate students focusing on biomaterials (e.g., metals and alloys, composites, polymers and ceramics), biodevices, basic fabrication and characterization techniques, and their general properties and applications. Prerequisites: ME 250, ME 251; or instructor's consent.

ME 659.  Mechanical Control Systems   (3).

Cross-listed as EE 684. Modeling and simulation of dynamic systems. Theory and analysis of the dynamic behavior of control systems, based on the laws of physics and linear mathematics. Concerns classical methods of feedback control systems and design. Prerequisites: (1) EE 282 and MATH 555, or (2) EE 383.

ME 660.  Polymer Materials and Engineering   (3).

Introduces the basic science and engineering of polymer materials. Provides the scientific foundation for an understanding of the relationships among material structures and properties of different types of polymer materials (thermoplastics, thermosets, synthetic fibers and rubbers, etc.) for various applications from consumer electronics to aviation industry. An understanding of these materials, processing techniques, their properties, and how they are applied in the industry. Prerequisite: ME 250 or CHEM 211.

ME 662.  Senior Capstone Design   (3).

1 Classroom hour; 6 Lab hours. A culminating course that allows students nearing graduation to combine the knowledge and skills acquired in their program and apply it to a major project or assignment. An exercise in the practice of mechanical engineering for undergraduate students in their graduating semester; students engage in a comprehensive design project requiring the integration of knowledge gained in prerequisite engineering, science and design courses along with economic comparisons of engineering alternatives considering the time value of money, taxes and depreciation. Team effort and both oral and written presentations are a part of the experience. For undergraduate students only. Prerequisites: ME 339, ME 439, ME 522. Corequisites: ME 633, ME 659.

ME 664.  Introduction to Fatigue and Fracture   (3).

Deals with the primary analytical methods used to quantify fatigue damage. These are the stress life approach, strain life approach and the fracture mechanics approach. Prerequisite: ME 439.

ME 665.  Selection of Materials for Design and Manufacturing   (3).

Focuses on the selection of engineering materials to meet product and manufacturing requirements. Solution to various product and manufacturing problems by appropriate selection of materials is illustrated through the use of numerous examples and case studies. Prerequisite: ME 439.

ME 667.  Mechanical Properties of Materials   (3).

Major focus on deformation mechanisms and on crystal defects that significantly affect mechanical properties. Also covers plasticity theory, yield criteria for multi-axial states of stress, fracture mechanics and fracture toughness. Includes some review of basic mechanics of materials and elasticity as needed. Prerequisite: ME 439.

ME 669.  Mechanical Vibrations and Acoustics   (3).

Introduction to the dynamics and vibrations of lumped-parameter models of mechanical systems and the fundamentals of acoustics including the study of simple harmonic systems, acoustics waves and transmission phenomena. Topics covered include kinematics, force-momentum formulation for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion, work-energy concepts, virtual displacements and virtual work, Lagrange’s equations for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion, and linearization of equations of motion, 3D elasticity, fluid and elastic wave equations, elastic and plastic waves in rods and beams, waves in plates, and dynamics and acoustics of cylindrical shells, acoustic fluids effects such as radiation and scattering by submerged plates and shells, and interaction between structural elements, response of plates and shells to high-intensity loads, dynamic plasticity and fracture, and structural damage caused by implosive and impact loads, free and forced vibration of linear multi-degree of freedom models of mechanical systems and matrix eigenvalue problems. Prerequisites: ME 325, 335, MATH 555; or instructor’s consent.

ME 670.  Introduction to Nanotechnology   (3).

Introduction to the underlying principles and applications of the field of nanotechnology and nanoscience. Covers basic principles of nanotechnology, nanomaterials and associated technologies and provides a background of the understanding, motivation, implementation, impact, future, and implications of nanotechnology. Focuses on processing techniques of nanoparticles, nanofibers/wires, nanotubes, nanofilms and nanocomposites using physical, chemical and physicochemical techniques, as well as their characterizations and potential commercial applications. An understanding of nanomaterials, fabrication and characterization techniques, and how they are applied in nanodevice fabrication. Material covered includes nanofabrication technology (how one achieves the nanometer length scale, from "bottom up" to "top down" technologies), the interdisciplinary nature of nanotechnology and nanoscience (including areas of chemistry, material science, physics and molecular biology), examples of nanoscience phenomena (the crossover from bulk to quantum mechanical properties), and applications (from integrated circuits, quantum computing, MEMS and bioengineering). Prerequisites: ME 250 and ME 398; or instructor’s consent.

ME 672.  Manufacturing of Composites   (3).

2 classroom hours; 3 laboratory hours. Provides the basis for understanding and use of composite materials in various engineering applications such as space and aerospace structures. Different classes of composite materials, the characteristics of their constituents, an introduction to micromechanics of composites, commonly used composite manufacturing techniques in detail, along with their capabilities and limitations, characterization methods, degradation, joining, tooling, machining, and recycling of composites is discussed. Contains laboratory modules designed to provide hands-on experience to emphasize the practical aspects of the topics covered. Prerequisites: ME 250, ME 251, AE 333; or instructor's consent.

ME 673.  Recovery of Engineering Materials   (3).

Introduces basic standards in recycling and reusing processes of different materials and the importance of recycling for the economy, health and environmental aspects. Focuses on basic separation techniques of various recyclable materials, recycled products reprocessing, as well as characterizations and potential commercial applications in different industries. Undergraduate and graduate students are expected to gain an understanding of recycling processes, recycled materials and applications. Prerequisites: ME 250, ME 398 and IME 255; or instructor’s consent.

ME 678.  Studies in Mechanical Engineering   (1-3).

Arranged individual, independent study in specialized content areas in mechanical engineering under the supervision of a faculty member. Requires written report or other suitable documentation of work for departmental records. Three (3) hours maximum technical elective credit. Not for graduate credit. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

ME 682.  Engineering Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer   (3).

Reviews the basic laws of fluid flow and heat transfer including the Navier-Stokes equations. Applications include a CFD software emphasizing the finite volume method and introducing turbulence modeling. Additional topics include grid generation and benchmarking exercises as well as open-ended projects. Prerequisites: ME 325 (or AE 227) and ME 522 (or AE 424) with a minimum grade of C in each, or instructor's consent.

ME 702.  Energy and Sustainability   (3).

Cross-listed as PHYS 702. Introduction to sustainability in a world of increasing population with more energy intensive lifestyles and diminishing resources; anthropogenic global climate change and the engineer's responsibilities; a critical look at the human ecological footprint; survey of alternative energy sources with special emphasis on wind and solar energy; life cycle analysis (LCA) of engineered products; the electric grid; emissions from various transportation modes, and alternatives. Consists of traditional lectures, seminars by invited experts, and the use of case studies. Meets the ME undergraduate curricular requirement for thermal/fluids elective and/or a general ME elective. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisite: ME 522 or PHYS 551; or instructor's consent.

ME 709.  Injury Biomechanics   (3).

Offers insight into the trauma problem and methods used to quantify and reduce it. Research methods used in injury biomechanics and their limitations are discussed including tests with human volunteers, cadavers, animals, mechanical crash test dummies and computer models. Provides a basic understanding of injury mechanisms and tolerances for the different body parts, including head, spine, thorax and extremities. Presents both automotive and aircraft impact safety regulations on occupant protection and related biomechanical limits. Students are exposed to and gain experience in using mathematical/numerical/computer models for injury biomechanics. Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

ME 719.  Basic Combustion Theory   (3).

Introduction to the fundamental principles of combustion processes. Examines the chemistry and physics of combustion phenomena, that is, detonation and flames, explosion and ignition processes. Prerequisites: CHEM 211, ME 502.

ME 728.  Advanced Electronic Materials   (3).

Focuses on electronic materials which are fundamental and critical to performances and applications of electronic devices. Structure-property and property-relationships of different types of electronic materials are discussed. Cutting edge technologies in development of advanced electronic materials and devices are introduced. High level knowledge of electronic material structures, properties and applications of electronic materials, and basic principles for material design for electronics. Prerequisites: ME 250 or PHYS 313; or instructor's consent.

ME 729.  Computer-Aided Analysis of Mechanical Systems   (3).

Modeling and analysis of planar motion for multibody mechanical systems including automatic generation of governing equations for kinematic and dynamic analysis, as well as computational methods and numerical solutions of governing equations. Computer applications. Open-ended student projects on engineering applications such as mechanisms design and vehicle dynamics. Technical elective course for mechanical engineering students. Prerequisites: ME 335, 339, MATH 555; or instructor's consent.

ME 730.  Modeling of Engineering Systems   (3).

Provides rigorous understanding of physics and engineering mathematics in order to model practical scientific and engineering problems in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, solid mechanic, and vibrations. Focuses on analytical approaches and introduces computational methods for modeling engineering systems using computer codes. Prerequisites: MATH 555 and ME 325, or departmental consent.

ME 731.  Advanced Heat Exchanger Design   (3).

Topics cover advanced design of fluidized bed, heat pipe, and high-temperature heat exchangers. Design experience through individual projects. Prerequisites: ME 521, ME 522.

ME 737.  Robotics and Control   (3).

A systems engineering approach to robotic science and technology. Fundamentals of manipulators, sensors, actuator, end-effectors and product design for automation. Includes kinematics, trajectory planning, control, programming of manipulator and simulation, along with introduction to artificial intelligence and computer vision. Prerequisite: ME 659 or equivalent.

ME 739.  Advanced Machine Design   (3).

A broad coverage of principles of mechanical analysis and design of machine elements. Emphasizes dynamic system modeling, prediction of natural frequencies and forced response, effect of support flexibility, failure theories used in design and fatigue life prediction. Typical mechanical systems studied are gears, bearings, shafts, rotating machinery and many types of spring-mass systems. Uses fundamentals learned in mechanics, strength of materials and thermal sciences to understand mechanical system modeling, analysis and design. Prerequisite: ME 541 or instructor's consent.

ME 745.  Design of Thermal Systems   (3).

Covers component design for a typical Rankine power cycle. Design of boilers, condensers, various types of turbine, pipe flow network, and power plant system integration are covered. Prerequisites: ME 521, ME 522.

ME 747.  Microcomputer-Based Mechanical Systems   (3).

2 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. Microcomputer-based real-time control of mechanical systems. Familiarizes students with design and methodology of software for real-time control. Includes an introduction to the C programming language which is most relevant to interfacing and implementation of control theory in computer-based systems. Laboratory sessions involve interfacing microcomputers to mechanical systems and software development for control methods such as PID. Prerequisite: ME 659 or instructor's consent.

ME 750.  Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering   (1-3).

New or special topics are presented on sufficient demand. Repeatable for credit when subject material warrants. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

ME 750AC.  Laser Applications in Manufacturing   (3).

Looks into laser technology which is defined as the methods, processes or products that make use of the spectrum of laser light, and any systems whose function is to study, measure, transform or transmit the light. Engineers, scientists and technicians are being called on to determine how the laser beams can be employed to assist in their operations so as to produce the most cost effective products and services. A good working knowledge of lasers is required to better understand their use for specific applications. Laser technology creates new opportunities and will have pervasive economic effects and substantial employment implications.

ME 751.  Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering   (1-3).

New or special topics are presented on sufficient demand. Repeatable for credit when subject material warrants. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

ME 752.  Failure Analysis Methods and Tools   (3).

Introduces the fundamental concepts of the failure analysis of engineering components at various environmental and testing conditions, and provides general knowledge on the procedures and mechanisms involved in failure analysis. Topics include procedural approaches in failure analysis; metallographic and fractographic studies, analysis of broken components by macroscopic, microscopic and nanoscopic observations, reviews common experimental methods used in failure analysis, and specific descriptions of failures for metallic, ceramics, polymeric and composite materials at micro- and nanoscales. Students learn advanced materials characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and compositional dot mapping, x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) optical microscopy, and fracture surface sample preparation. Undergraduate and graduate students are expected to gain an understanding of these subjects, and how they are applied in industrial applications. Prerequisites: ME 250, and ME 439; or instructor's consent.

ME 753.  Advanced Materials for Energy Systems   (3).

Introduces the advanced materials and fundamental principles behind the energy systems and devices. Focuses on advanced materials (e.g., metals and alloys, composites, polymers, ceramics and semiconductors) at micro- and nanosize, novel energy conversion systems and devices, fabrication and characterization techniques and their general properties and applications. Efficiencies of most energy systems are limited by materials engineering and reliability of these systems. Covers the application of scientific and engineering principles for materials used in energy systems. Equips students with knowledge and skills that enable them to solve a wide range of energy materials technology and engineering problems to minimize operational risks and maximize process reliability, and ensure a more sustainable future. Students gain an understanding of these advanced materials and devices, importance of them, and how they are applied in energy related technologies and future developments. Prerequisites: ME 250, ME 398, ME 469 or ME 522 (either one of ME 469 or ME 522); or instructor's consent.

ME 755.  Intermediate Thermodynamics   (3).

Laws of thermodynamics, introduction to statistical concepts of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties, chemical thermodynamics, Maxwell's relations. Prerequisite: ME 502 or departmental consent.

ME 758.  Nonlinear Controls of Electro-Mechanical Systems   (3).

Standard first nonlinear controls course. Covers stability, feedback linearization (robotic, mechanical, electro-mechanical system applications), differentially-flat systems (with rotor-craft position tracking applications), back-stepping control-design methods (electro-mechanical, robotic and rotor-craft applications), MIMO systems, normal form, zero dynamics, and adaptive control of robotic systems. EE 792, Linear Systems, while not a prerequisite, is helpful. Prerequisite: ME 659 or EE 684; or equivalent.

ME 759.  Neural Networks for Control   (3).

Introduces specific neural network architectures used for dynamic system modeling and intelligent control. Includes theory of feed-forward, recurrent, and Hopfield networks; applications in robotics, aircraft and vehicle guidance, chemical processes, and optimal control. Prerequisite: ME 659 or departmental consent.

ME 760.  Fracture Mechanics   (3).

Covers fracture mechanics in metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. Suitable for graduate and undergraduate study in metallurgy and materials, mechanical engineering, civil engineering and aerospace engineering where a combined materials-fracture mechanics approach is stressed. Prerequisite: ME 439 or instructor's consent.

ME 762.  Polymeric Composite Materials   (3).

Designed to provide students with an understanding and knowledge about polymeric composite materials. The characteristics of various reinforcements and polymeric matrices are presented and their processing techniques, capabilities and limitations are highlighted. In addition, various methods for manufacturing of polymeric composites along with their capabilities are discussed. Characterization techniques, test methods, assembly, and joining of polymeric composites are presented. Prerequisites: ME 250, ME 251, AE 333, ME 439, and MATH 555; or instructor's consent.

ME 764.  Thermodynamics of Solids   (3).

Presents basic thermodynamic concepts which form the working tools throughout the course. Emphasizes the interpretation of certain types of phase diagrams — not upon the use of thermodynamics to assist phase diagram construction but upon the use of phase diagrams to obtain thermodynamic quantities. Also, the thermodynamics of defects and defect interactions in metals, ceramics, polymers, elemental semiconductors, and compounds. Prerequisites: ME 250 and 398 or departmental consent.

ME 766.  SEM and EDAX   (3).

Introduces Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), a powerful tool in materials science and engineering which can be used to analyze structural defects in materials. Discusses both the theory and experimental methods, as well as the application of these methods. Prerequisite: ME 250 or departmental consent.

ME 767.  X-Ray Diffraction   (3).

Theory of X-ray diffraction, experimental methods, and their applications which can include determination of the crystal structure of materials, chemical analysis, stress and strain measurements, study of phase equilibria, measurement of particle size, and determination of the orientation of a single crystal. Prerequisites: ME 250 and AE 333 or departmental consent.

ME 769.  Impact Dynamics   (3).

Classical methods are presented to analyze mechanical components and structures for impact response. Impact methods include stereo mechanics, contact mechanics, impulse-momentum, stress-wave, energy method and plastic impact. Finite element analysis (FEA) modeling of impact events are examined and applied to classical methods. Material properties evaluation for impact conditions, design techniques for impact and shock mitigation, and an introduction to crashworthiness are also presented. Course goals are to understand characteristics such as loading, stresses, deflections, contact forces and material response to impact events. Prerequisite: ME 439 or instructor's consent.

ME 777.  Mechanical Engineering Seminar   (0).

A mechanical engineering graduate seminar to develop critical thinking/foundation for students' future professional careers with cutting-edge research activities in the area of mechanical engineering. Provides the necessary scientific and mechanical engineering knowledge for future successful professionals. Students are required to register and pass this course at least one semester during their entire graduate study. Course meets biweekly per semester. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: none.

ME 781.  Cooperative Education   (2-8).

A work-related placement with a supervised professional experience to complement and enhance the student's academic program. Intended for master's level or doctoral students in mechanical engineering. Repeatable for credit. May not be used to satisfy degree requirements. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisites: graduate standing, departmental consent, graduate GPA of 3.000 or above.

ME 781A.  Cooperative Education   (1).

Introduces the student to professional practice by working in industry in an academically-related job and provides a planned professional experience designed to complement and enhance the student's academic program. Individualized programs must be formulated in consultation with, and approved by, appropriate faculty sponsors and cooperative education coordinators. Intended for students who will be working full time on their co-op assignment and need not be enrolled in any other course. Graded Cr/NCr unless student has received permission before enrolling for course to be used as an elective. Repeatable. Prerequisite: approval by the appropriate faculty sponsor.

ME 781P.  Cooperative Education   (1).

Introduces the student to professional practice by working in industry in an academically-related job and provides a planned professional experience designed to complement and enhance the student's academic program. Individualized programs must be formulated in consultation with, and approved by, appropriate faculty sponsors and cooperative education coordinators. Students must enroll concurrently in a minimum of 6 hours of coursework including this course in addition to a minimum of 20 hours per week at their co-op assignment. Graded Cr/NCr unless student has received permission before enrolling for course to be used as an elective. Repeatable. Prerequisite: approval by the appropriate faculty sponsor.