MILS - Military Science

Courses numbered 100 to 299 = lower-division; 300 to 499 = upper-division; 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate.

MILS 101.  Introduction to the Army   (1).

Focuses on introduction to the Army and critical thinking. Introduces cadets to the Army and the profession of arms. Examines the Army profession and what it means to be a professional in the U.S. Army. Focuses on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of the Army Leadership Requirements Model while gaining a complete understanding of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. Cadets also learn how resiliency and fitness supports their development as Army leaders. Includes a weekly lab facilitated by military science labs III cadets and supervised by Cadre.

MILS 101L.  Leadership Labs   (0.5).

ROTC cadet training involves classroom instructions on leadership techniques, time management, ethics, critical thinking skills and military operations. Cadets are provided the opportunity to apply their knowledge and understanding in a field setting during weekly practical exercises called a lab. This provides the opportunity for the cadets to challenge themselves and learn in a safe environment. Labs range from topics covering drill and ceremony, land navigation, squad tactics to a final culminating event at the end of each semester called Leader Stakes. All labs are designed to develop the knowledge and leadership abilities of the cadets. Labs are run by cadre.

MILS 102.  Foundations of Agile and Adaptive Leadership   (1).

Introduces students (here referred to as “cadets”) to the personal challenges and competencies critical for effective leadership. Cadets develop life skills such as critical thinking, time management, goal setting and communication. Cadets learn the basics of the communications process and the importance for leaders to develop the essential skills to effectively communicate in the Army. Cadets begin learning the basics of squad level tactics reinforced during a weekly lab (MILS 102L) facilitated by military science labs III cadets and supervised by cadre.

MILS 102L.  Leadership Labs   (0.5).

ROTC cadet training involves classroom instruction on leadership techniques, time management, ethics, critical thinking skills and military operations. Cadets are provided the opportunity to apply their knowledge and understanding in a field setting during weekly practical exercises called a lab. Provides an opportunity for the cadets to challenge themselves and learn in a safe environment. Labs range from topics covering drill and ceremony, land navigation and squad tactics, to a final culminating event at the end of each semester called Leader Stakes. All labs are designed to develop the knowledge and leadership abilities of the cadets. Labs are run by cadre.

MILS 109.  Physical Fitness Training   (1).

Focuses on enhancing the student’s fitness level through the use of military-style physical training.

MILS 201.  Leadership and Decision Making   (3).

Focuses on leadership and decision making. Adds depth to the cadets’ understanding of the Adaptability Army Learning Area. Outcomes are demonstrated through critical and creative thinking, and the ability to use troop leading procedures (TLP) to apply innovative solutions to problems. The Army profession is also stressed through leadership forums and a leadership self-assessment. Students are then required to apply their knowledge outside the classroom in a hands-on performance-oriented environment during a weekly lab facilitated by military science labs III cadets and supervised by cadre.

MILS 202.  Army Doctrine and Team Development   (3).

Focuses on Army doctrine and team development. Begins the journey to understand and demonstrate competencies as they relate to Army doctrine. Army values, teamwork and warrior ethos and their relationship to the Law of Land Warfare and philosophy of military service are also stressed. The ability to lead and follow is also covered through team building exercises at squad level. Students are required to apply their knowledge outside the classroom in a hands-on performance-oriented environment during an integrated weekly lab facilitated by military science labs III cadets and supervised by cadre.

MILS 301.  Training Management and the Warfighting Function   (3).

Academically challenging course where students analyze, test and relate the fundamentals of training management and how the Army operates through the warfighting functions. At the conclusion of this course, students are capable of planning, preparing and executing training for a squad conducting small unit tactics. Includes a lab per week using peer facilitation overseen by military science labs IVs, supervised by ROTC cadre.

MILS 302.  Applied Leadership in Small Unit Operations   (3).

Academically challenging course where students study, practice and apply the fundamentals of direct level leadership and small unit tactics at the platoon level. At the conclusion of this course, students are capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a platoon in the execution of a mission. Includes a lab per week using peer facilitation overseen by military science labs IVs, supervised by ROTC cadre. Successful completion of this course helps prepare students for the Cadet Summer Training Advance Camp, which they attend in the summer at Fort Knox, KY. Prerequisite(s): MILS 301.

MILS 351.  The U.S. Army Since the Vietnam War   (3).

Cross-listed as HIST 551. Examines the history of the U.S. Army after the end of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. Examines how the U.S. Army was shaped by the Vietnam War and its aftermath, and how that Army responded to the loss of the United States’ only near-peer competitor with the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War. Examines the competing strains of thought on the Army’s future through the competing lenses of its 1990s low-intensity conflict military interventions and its struggle to modernize in an era of shrinking budgets. Concludes by examining how these events shaped the U.S. Army’s performance in the ongoing wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria.

MILS 401.  The Army Officer   (3).

Focuses on development of the Army officer. Academically challenging course where students develop the knowledge, skills and abilities to plan, resource and assess training at the small unit level. Students learn about Army programs that support counseling subordinates and evaluating performance, values and ethics, career planning, and legal responsibilities. At the conclusion of this course, students are familiar with how to plan, prepare, execute and continuously assess the conduct of training at the company or field grade officer level. Includes a lab per week overseeing military science labs III lesson facilitation and is supervised by ROTC cadre. Prerequisite(s): MILS 301 and MILS 302.

MILS 402.  Company Grade Leadership   (3).

Academically challenging course where students develop the knowledge, skills and abilities required of junior officers pertaining to the Army in unified land operations and company grade officer roles and responsibilities. Includes reading assignments, homework assignments, small group assignments, briefings, case studies, practical exercises, a mid-term exam and an oral practicum as the final exam. The oral practicum explores student knowledge of how they are prepared for the Army warfighting challenges (AWFC) covered throughout the ROTC advanced course. Successful completion of this course assists in preparing students for the BOLC B course and is a mandatory requirement for commissioning. Includes a lab per week overseeing military science labs III lesson facilitation and is supervised by ROTC cadre. Prerequisite(s): MILS 301, MILS 302 and MILS 401.