IME - Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Courses numbered 100 to 299 = lower-division; 300 to 499 = upper-division; 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate.

IME 150.  Workshop in Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering   (1-3).

Offered from time to time on various topics in industrial or manufacturing engineering.

IME 222.  Engineering Graphics   (2).

Provides an opportunity for the undergraduate student to learn the basics of engineering graphics as a tool for communicating design ideas. Covers basics of descriptive geometry, spatial relationships involving orthographic projections, auxiliary views, and pictorial projections. Aspects of design implementation such as dimensioning, tolerancing, sectional views, and working drawings are also included. Prerequisite: MATH 123. Corequisite: IME 222L or equivalent.

IME 222BA.  EN Graphics Badge: Orthographic Multiview Projections   (0.5).

Introduce students to Engineering Graphics, and to Orthographic Multiview Projections. The badge will cover first and third angle projections, primary views, section views, auxiliary views and line types. It will make use of trigonometry to calculate distance and angles between features. Graded Bg/NBg.

IME 222BB.  EN Graphics Badge: Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing   (0.5).

Introduces students to geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T). Orthographic multiview projections incorporating GD&T notation will be analyzed geometrically. Implications of GD&T notation in terms of tolerance zones and fit between parts will be discussed. Graded Bg/NBg.

IME 222BC.  EN Graphics Badge: Parts   (0.5).

Introduce students to three-dimensional (3D) object representations. The badge will make emphasis on isometric projections. Isometric projections will be built from other object representation forms, including orthographic multiview projections. Parts will also be analyzed geometrically. Graded Bg/NBg.

IME 222BD.  EN Graphics Badge: Assembly   (0.5).

Introduce students to working drawings, and the various components of such drawings. Real engineering drawings of various assemblies will be analyzed geometrically. Special conventions used in assembly drawings will be discussed. Graded Bg/NBg.

IME 222L.  Graphics Lab   (1).

3 Lab hours. Provides an opportunity for students to reinforce the basics of engineering graphics using a suitable CAD software. Includes the practice of using a CAD software to understand and produce basic spatial relationships involving orthographic projections, auxiliary views, sectional views, pictorial projections, dimensioning, tolerancing, working drawings, 3D assembly and implementing these on a suitable CAD software. Prerequisite: MATH 123. Corequisite: IME 222 or equivalent.

IME 254.  Engineering Probability and Statistics I   (3).

Studies the concepts of probability theory, random variables, distributions, moments, sample statistics and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: MATH 243 or 252.

IME 255.  Engineering Economy   (3).

Economic comparisons of engineering alternatives considering the time value of money, taxes and depreciation; accounting and its relationship to economic analysis; replacement decisions. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 242 or 251.

IME 258.  Manufacturing Methods and Materials I   (3).

Provides a basic understanding of materials and processes used to manufacture products. Introduces material properties and metrology. Covers material removal, CNC machining, nontraditional machining, additive manufacturing, casting, forming, conditioning, joining, and plastics and composites manufacturing. Key process features such as energy sources and kinematics, as well as interrelationships between processing and properties are identified. Introduces process planning. In a companion course, IME 258L that is required to be taken concurrently by some majors, students gain extensive hands-on experience in different manufacturing processes and in teamwork.

IME 258L.  Manufacturing Methods and Materials I Lab   (1).

Companion course to IME 258, required to be taken concurrently by some majors. Students gain extensive hands-on experience in different manufacturing processes and in teamwork. Corequisite: IME 258.

IME 281P.  Cooperative Education   (1).

Introduces the student to engineering practice by working in industry in an engineering-related job and provides a planned professional experience designed to complement and enhance the student's academic program. Individualized programs must be formulated in consultation with, and approved by, appropriate faculty sponsors and cooperative education coordinators. Students must enroll concurrently in a minimum of 6 hours of coursework including this course in addition to a minimum of 20 hours per week at their co-op assignment. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisites: successful completion of 20 hours toward an engineering degree and approval by appropriate faculty sponsor.

IME 361.  Industrial Controls and Instrumentation   (4).

3 Classroom hours; 2 Lab hours. Cross-listed as ENGT 361. Introduces the principles of measurement and data acquisition, transmission and application in industrial and commercial systems. The theory and application of electronic programmable devices such as programmable logic controllers, temperature controllers, counters, etc., Ladder logic and input/output devices are emphasized. Laboratory exercises include loop wiring, calibration, controller configuration and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: ENGT 320 or EE 282 with a minimum grade of C (2.000).

IME 410.  Robotics Technology   (3).

2 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. Cross-listed as ENGT 410. Examines systems using robotics in technology. Provides the fundamentals of manipulators, sensors, actuator, end-effectors, and product design for automation. Includes kinematics, controls, programming of manipulator, and simulation. Also covers artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: IME 361 or ENGT 361 with a minimum grade of C (2.000) or instructor's consent.

IME 411.  Microcomputer-Based Mechanical Systems Technologies   (3).

2 Classroom hours; 3 Lab hours. Cross-listed as ENGT 411. Focuses on microcomputer-based real-time control of mechanical systems technologies. Familiarizes students with software methodologies used for real-time control. Includes laboratory sessions involving interfacing microcomputers to mechanical systems. Prerequisites: ENGT 361 and 410; or instructor's approval.

IME 425.  Kinematic and Dynamic Design   (3).

Introduces students to the concepts of position, displacement, velocity, acceleration, and the equations of motion governing the kinematics and the dynamics of mechanisms, including linkage, cam and gear systems Engineering drawings of typical machine elements containing both parametric and geometric tolerancing are interpreted. The theory of mechanisms and tolerancing/fit design are applied through laboratory exercises and a team-term project conducted in a manufacturing laboratory equipped with CNC machines, welding and metrology equipment. Prerequisites: IME 222, 258 and PHYS 313.

IME 452.  Work Systems   (3).

The documentation, measurement and design of work systems. Includes work measurement systems, methods engineering, work sampling, predetermined time systems and economic justification. Prerequisite: IME 254. Pre- or corequisite: IME 255.

IME 480.  Selected Topics in Industrial Engineering   (1-3).

New or special course material presented upon sufficient student demand. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

IME 481A.  Cooperative Education   (1).

Introduces the student to professional practice by working in industry in an academically-related job and provides a planned professional experience designed to complement and enhance the student's academic program. Individualized programs must be formulated in consultation with, and approved by, appropriate faculty sponsors and cooperative education coordinators. Intended for students who will be working full time on their co-op assignment and need not be enrolled in any other course. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisites: junior standing and approval by the appropriate faculty sponsor.

IME 481I.  Noncredit Internship   (0).

Complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment as an intern. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

IME 481N.  Internship   (1).

Complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment as an intern. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

IME 481P.  Cooperative Education   (1).

Introduces the student to engineering practice by working in industry in an engineering-related job and provides a planned professional experience designed to complement and enhance the student's academic program. Individualized programs must be formulated in consultation with, and approved by, appropriate faculty sponsors and cooperative education coordinators. Students must enroll concurrently in a minimum of 6 hours of coursework including this course in addition to a minimum of 20 hours per week at their co-op assignment. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisites: junior standing and approval by appropriate faculty sponsor.

IME 490.  Independent Study   (1-3).

Arranged individual independent study in specialized areas of industrial engineering under the supervision of a faculty member. Repeatable for creditt. Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

IME 524.  Descriptive Analytics   (3).

A study of confidence interval, regression analysis, analysis of variance, correlation analysis and design of experiments emphasizing applications to engineering. For undergraduate students only. Prerequisite: IME 254.

IME 549.  Industrial Ergonomics   (3).

A systematic approach to the optimization of the human-task-environment system. Includes work space design, manual materials handling, work related musculoskeletal disorders and environmental factors. Emphasizes applications in industry. Prerequisite: IME 254 or departmental consent.

IME 550.  Operations Research I   (3).

Covers deterministic models and methods in operations research including linear programming, integer programming, and network optimization to aid in the analysis and solution of complex, large-scale decision problems. Prerequisite: MATH 511.

IME 553.  Production Systems   (3).

Quantitative techniques used in the analysis and control of production systems. Includes forecasting, inventory models, operation planning and scheduling. Prerequisite: IME 254. Pre- or corequisite: IME 255.

IME 554.  Statistical Quality Control   (3).

A study of the measurement and control of product quality using statistical methods. Includes acceptance sampling, statistical process control and total quality management. Pre- or corequisite: IME 254.

IME 556.  Information Systems   (3).

Provides a basic understanding of information systems in a modern enterprise, including database design, information technology and ethics using hands-on activities and directed classroom discussion. For ISME undergraduates students only. Prerequisite: CS 211 or MIS 310 or MATH 451.

IME 557.  Safety Engineering   (3).

Environmental aspects of accident prevention, industrial compensation and safety legislation. Fundamental concepts of occupational health and hygiene. Prerequisite: IME 254.

IME 558.  Manufacturing Methods and Materials II   (4).

3 Classroom hours; 2 Lab hours. Covers theoretical and practical aspects of manufacturing processes, including material properties and behavior as influenced by the manufacturing process. In-depth study of such manufacturing processes as casting heat treatment, bulk forming, sheet metal forming, metal cutting, nontraditional machining and process monitoring through measurement of manufacturing process variables. Also includes laboratory experience and plant tours. Prerequisites: IME 258, ME 250. Corequisite: IME 558L.

IME 563.  Facilities Planning and Design   (3).

Quantitative and qualitative approaches to problems in facilities planning and design, emphasizing activity relationships, space requirements, materials handling and storage, and plant layout. Quantitative and qualitative approaches to selection of material handling devices and design of storage systems, and introduction to concepts of supply chain. Prerequisites: IME 452, 550, 553.

IME 565.  Systems Simulation   (3).

The design of simulation models and techniques for use in designing and evaluating discrete systems, including manufacturing systems too complex to be solved analytically. Emphasizes general purpose computer simulation languages. Prerequisite: computer programming competency. For ISME undergraduate students only. Pre- or corequisites: IME 553, 524.

IME 590.  Industrial Engineering Design I   (3).

An industry-based team design project using industrial engineering and manufacturing engineering principles; performed under faculty supervision. May not be counted toward graduate credit. Prerequisites: IME 553; must be within two semesters of graduation or departmental consent.

IME 625.  Product Performance Evaluation using CAE   (3).

Covers the application of analysis and simulation methods and tools to evaluate product designs for strength, life and robustness. Includes a lab experience and a design project aimed at developing proficiency in virtual product evaluation. Prerequisites: AE 333 and IME 425.

IME 650.  Operations Research II   (3).

The second of a two-course sequence on models and solution approaches commonly used in the analysis of decision-making problems. Familiarizes students with nonlinear deterministic as well as probabilistic models in operations research and their applications. In particular, upon completion of this course, students develop an understanding of how to model and analyze systems that show nonlinear and probabilistic behavior. Moreover, students learn how to use state-of-the-art optimization solvers. Topics include nonlinear programming, decision making under uncertainty, game theory, Markov chains, queuing theory and dynamic programming. Prerequisite: IME 550 or instructor's consent.

IME 664.  Engineering Management   (3).

Introduction to the design and control of technologically-based projects. Considers both the theoretical and practical aspects of systems models, organizational development, project planning and control, resource allocation, team development and personal skill assessment. Prerequisites: IME 255, (IME 254 or ENGT 354), all with a C or better.

IME 676.  Aircraft Manufacturing and Assembly   (3).

Covers key aspects of assembly design for aircraft structures. First module covers design of jigs and fixtures to locate parts and machine features to tolerance, and the effect of part and tool stiffness on the tolerances. Second module covers gage design and gage studies, and geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. Third module covers assembly planning and best practices for aircraft assembly. Laboratory experiments and case studies are used to understand issues related to aircraft assembly. For ISME undergraduate students only. Prerequisite: IME 258.

IME 690.  Industrial Engineering Design II   (3).

Continuation of the design project initiated in IME 590 or the performance of a second industrial engineering design project; an industry-based team design project using industrial and manufacturing engineering principles; performed under faculty supervision. May not be counted toward graduate credit. Prerequisites: IME 590 and departmental consent.

IME 724.  Statistical Methods for Engineers   (3).

For graduate students majoring in engineering. Students study and model real-life engineering problems and draw reliable conclusions through applications of probability theory and statistical techniques. Not available for undergraduate credit. Prerequisite: MATH 243.

IME 740.  Analysis of Decision Processes   (3).

Decision analysis as it applies to capital equipment selection and replacement, process design and policy development. Explicit consideration of risk, uncertainty and multiple attributes is developed and applied using modern computer-aided analysis techniques. Prerequisites: IME 254, 255.

IME 749.  Ergonomic Assessment Methods   (3).

Covers current and commonly used risk and exposure assessment methods used for musculoskeletal disorders in the workplace. Students develop an understanding and working knowledge of how to evaluate and control the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in the design of workplaces. Critical assessments and discussions of risk and exposure assessment techniques are performed relative to the strengths and weaknesses of each technique as well as the evidence for risk control and validity of the various methods. Prerequisite: IME 549 or instructor's consent.

IME 753.  Advanced Linear Programming   (3).

Linear and integer programming formulations, simplex method, geometry of the simplex method, sensitivity and duality, interior point methods. Prerequisite: IME 550 or instructor's consent.

IME 754.  Reliability and Maintainability Engineering   (3).

Studies problems of quantifying, assessing and verifying reliability. Presents various factors that determine the capabilities of components emphasizing practical applications. Examples and problems cover a broad range of engineering fields. Prerequisite: IME 524 or 724.

IME 755.  Design of Experiments   (3).

Application of analysis of variance and experimental design for engineering studies. Includes general design methodology, single-factor designs, randomized blocks, factorial designs, fractional replication and confounding. Prerequisite: IME 524 or 724.

IME 758.  Analysis of Manufacturing Processes   (3).

Introduces students to plasticity and builds upon their knowledge of mechanics and heat transfer in order to analyze various manufacturing processes. Numerical techniques (mainly finite element analysis) as well as theoretical methods are introduced and applied to analysis of processes such as open and closed die forging, superplastic forming, machining, grinding, laser welding, etc. The effect of friction, material properties and process parameters on the mechanics of the processes and process outputs is the main focus of study. Prerequisite: AE 333.

IME 759.  Ergonomic Interventions   (3).

Provides an understanding and working knowledge of how to evaluate and control the risk of musculoskeletal disorders in the design of workplaces and processes. Scientific aspects of intervention design and effectiveness assessment are discussed, including an assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the intervention research literature. Prerequisite: IME 549 or instructor's consent.

IME 760.  Ergonomics Topics   (3).

New or special courses on topics in ergonomics and human factors engineering. Repeatable for credit with a change of content. Prerequisite: departmental consent.

IME 764.  Systems Engineering and Analysis   (3).

Presentation of system design process from the identification of a need through conceptual design, preliminary design, detail design and development, and system test and evaluation. Studies operational feasibility, reliability, maintainability, supportability and economic feasibility. Prerequisites: IME 254, 255.

IME 767.  Lean Manufacturing   (3).

Introduces lean concepts as applied to the manufacturing environment. Deals with the concepts of value, value stream, flow, pull and perfection. Includes waste identification, value stream mapping, visual controls and lean metrics. Prerequisite: IME 553.

IME 775.  Computer Integrated Manufacturing   (3).

A study of the concepts, components and technologies of CIM systems; enterprise modeling for CIM, local area networks, CAD/CAM interfaces, information flow for CIM, shop floor control and justification of CIM systems. Prerequisites: knowledge of a programming language, IME 558.

IME 777.  IME Colloquium   (0).

Presentations and discussions of industrial engineering problems, research methods, and case analyses for graduate students. Repeatable for credit.

IME 780.  Topics in Industrial Engineering   (3).

New or special courses are presented under this listing. Repeatable for credit when subject matter warrants.

IME 780AK.  Advanced Industrial Information Systems   (3).

Utilize database and analytical software to develop advanced industrial information systems. Topics include: advance Microsoft Access for end-users, Logic-based systems, Analytics in Microsoft Excel, data modeling, and data analytics.

IME 780AL.  Energy Analytics & Management   (3).

Covers topics on energy auditing, rate structures, economic evaluation techniques, analysis of opportunities in energy systems including but not limited to lighting, compressed air, process heating, steam, and other process-based energy systems. Also covers multiple software programs used by energy auditing professionals. Prerequisites: EE 282 or instructor’s approval.

IME 780AM.  Advanced Cyber-Physical Systems   (3).

A cyber-physical system is a set of interconnected digital computing devices that interact with physical world through sensors and actuators in a feedback control loop. The course outlines the basic principles of design, modeling, and analysis of cyber-physical systems with the use of mathematical abstractions, control theories, data communication, and distributed algorithms. The course also explains some of the Industry-4.0 technologies, such as cognitive robotics and Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), with some hands-on lab activities.

IME 780AN.  Big Data Analytics in Engineering   (3).

Provides a graduate-level introduction to methods in data science and big data analytics with engineering applications. Specifically, examines some widely used statistical methods and machine learning tools for big data (data with high volume, velocity and variety). A variety of up-to-date industrial engineering topics are covered as application examples. Prerequisites: basic engineering statistics and programming skills.

IME 780AO.  Robot Programming and Application   (3).

Covers the broad interdisciplinary topic of industrial robotics. Discusses path planning and programming of robot manipulators, collaborative robots and mobile robots. Also covers the use of feedback sensors. Both theoretical and practical approaches are discussed to facilitate a smooth transition from theories to applications. Practical applications are facilitated by robot simulation software. Upon successful completion of the course, the student is able to use advanced methods for robot programming and gains basic familiarization with robot simulation software.

IME 780AP.  Neural Networks and Machine Learning   (3).

Introduces the theory and practical applications of artificial neural networks and machine learning. Covers several network paradigms, emphasizing the use of neural networks as a solution tool for industrial problems which require pattern recognition, predictive and interpretive models, pattern classification, optimization and clustering. Covers machine learning. Presents examples and discusses them from a variety of areas including quality detection, process monitoring, robotics, simulation metamodeling, diagnostic models, combinatorial optimization and machine vision. For students from a variety of disciplines.

IME 781.  Cooperative Education   (1-8).

A work-related placement with a supervised professional experience to complement and enhance the student's academic program. Intended for master's level or doctoral students in IME. Repeatable for credit. May not be used to satisfy degree requirements. Prerequisites: departmental consent, graduate GPA of 3.000 or above.

IME 781P.  Cooperative Education   (1).

Introduces the student to professional practice by working in industry in an academically-related job and provides a planned professional experience designed to complement and enhance the student's academic program. Individualized programs must be formulated in consultation with, and approved by, appropriate faculty sponsors and cooperative education coordinators. Students must enroll concurrently in a minimum of 6 hours of coursework including this course in addition to a minimum of 20 hours per week at their co-op assignment. Graded Cr/NCr unless student has received permission before enrolling for course to be used as an elective. Repeatable for credit. For graduate students.

IME 783.  Supply Chain Management   (3).

Quantitative and qualitative techniques used in the design and management of the supply chain. Includes distribution management, multi-plant coordination, optimal design of the logistics network, adequate safety stock levels and the risk pooling concept, and integrating decision support systems (DDS) in the management of the supply chain. Prerequisite: IME 553.