LING - Linguistics

Courses numbered 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate. (Individual courses may be limited to undergraduate students only.) Courses numbered 800 to 999 = graduate.

LING 505A.  Advanced French Phonetics   (2).

2 Classroom hours; 2 Lab hours. Cross-listed as FREN 505. Includes articulatory phonetics, phonemics, sound/symbol correspondences, dialectal and stylistic variations. Required for future French teachers. Prerequisite: any 200-level FREN course or departmental consent.

LING 505B.  Russian Phonology   (2).

Cross-listed as RUSS 505. Corrective pronunciation and auditory perception for non-native speakers of Russian. Includes articulatory phonetics, phonemics and morphophonemics, as well as the study and production of intonation contours (intonatsionnye konstruktsii). Prerequisite: any 200-level course or instructor's consent.

LING 505C.  Spanish Phonetics   (3).

Cross-listed as SPAN 505. Includes articulatory phonetics, phonemics, sound/symbol correspondences, dialectal and stylistic variations. Required for future Spanish teachers. Prerequisite: any 200-level SPAN course or departmental consent.

LING 506.  Acoustic and Perceptual Phonetics   (3).

Cross-listed as CSD 506. Studies the physical patterns (acoustic) of speech sounds and the importance of these acoustic patterns to speech recognition (perception). Focuses on segmental phonemes (vowels and consonants) and on suprasegmental characteristics such as stress and intonation. Introduces different types of speech analysis techniques and discusses how they may be used to study the acoustic patterns of speech sounds. Studies how different aspects of the speech signal relate to listener perception. Note: The CSD 506 or 506H sections must be taken in order for this course to count toward the CSD undergraduate major. Prerequisite: CSD 301.

LING 520.  ASL: Nonverbal Communication   (3).

Cross-listed as CSD 520. Nonverbal way of communication which forms an integral base for communication in American Sign Language. Emphasizes the use and understanding of facial expression, gestures, pantomime and body language. Role play and acting out are required as part of this class. Pre- or corequisite: CSD 370 or instructor's consent.

LING 546.  Spanish Language Learning   (3).

Cross-listed as SPAN 546. Introduces language learning from an applied linguistics perspective: the processes of first and second language acquisition, elements of Spanish grammar that are often difficult for English speakers, and social aspects of language learning. Appropriate for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students. Taught in Spanish. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisite: SPAN 526 or departmental consent.

LING 547.  Spanish in the U.S.   (3).

Cross-listed as SPAN 547. Explores the structural and social aspects of Spanish in the United States. Examines the history and social context of the use of Spanish in the U.S. as well as dialectical and contact phenomena in U.S. Spanish. Also covers Spanish in education, in the media and in other aspects of public life in the U.S. Appropriate for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students. Taught in Spanish. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisite: SPAN 526 or departmental consent.

LING 590.  Special Studies in Linguistics   (1-3).

Topic selected and announced by individual instructor. Credit is assigned to Group A, B or C depending on content. Repeatable for credit when content varies.

LING 590M.  Languages and Language Attitudes in the U.S.   (3).

Cross-listed as ENGL 580AF. Community-based research seminar examines the social, economic and educational ramifications of various languages and attitudes to these languages in the U.S. Topics include the linguistic intersection of race, gender and social class; comparisons of standardized and Standard English to other dialects such as African American Vernacular English (AAVE); and the role of linguistics in the formation of language policy. Course takes a hands-on approach and students are involved in research design and data analysis. Students also have opportunities to participate in service learning, in organizations such as International Rescue Committee and AmeriCorps.

LING 595.  Directed Readings   (1-3).

Credit assigned to Group A, B or C depending on content. Repeatable for credit.

LING 635.  Introduction to Romance Linguistics   (3).

Cross-listed as FREN 635 and SPAN 635. Provides a contrastive examination of the phonology, morphology and syntax of the major contemporary Romance languages (French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan and Romanian). Introduces students to the sound and writing system and basic grammar of Latin, and contrasts the phonological and grammatical systems of the contemporary Romance languages (French and Spanish in particular) with those of Latin. It compares specific features of the modern Romance languages synchronically (i.e., apart from Latin) as well. Students are advised to have a solid grounding in at least one Romance language (preferably French or Spanish) and a familiarity with at least one other (French, Spanish, Latin, Italian or Portuguese). Prerequisite: departmental or instructor's consent.

LING 651.  Language & Culture   (3).

Cross-listed as ANTH 651 and MCLL 651. An introduction to the major themes in the interactions of language and society, and language and culture, including ethnography of communication, linguistic relativity and determinism; types of language contact, the linguistic repertoire, and cross-cultural discourse analysis. Content may vary with instructor. Prerequisite: 3 hours of linguistics or MCLL 351 or 6 hours of anthropology.

LING 663.  Languages and Language Attitudes in USA   (3).

Cross-listed as ENGL 663. In this community-based research seminar, students examine the social, economic and educational ramifications of various languages and attitudes to these languages in the USA. Covers the linguistic intersection of race, gender and social class; compares standardized and Standard English to other dialects such as African American Vernacular English; and the role of linguistics in forming language policy. Takes a hands-on approach and involves students in research design and data analysis. Course includes diversity content.

LING 664.  Quantitative Methods for Literary and Linguistic Studies   (3).

Cross-listed as ENGL 664. Introduces the basic concepts of data analysis and statistical computing as used in literary and linguistic studies. Students get a better understanding of applying quantitative reasoning, visualization and data analysis to several problems in a wide range of fields in the humanities, such as linguistics, literature, and by extension, psychology and cognitive science. Students also consider practical applications of quantitative analysis in the humanities, including bibliometric and attribution study.

LING 665.  History of the English Language   (3).

This course offers an in-depth historical study of the English language by tracing the history of how the language has changed across time. We will consider Old, Middle, Modern, American English, as well as newer World Englishes. We will address the nature and mechanisms of language change over time and the social, political, and other historical conditions related to such changes. The course will focus on the particular phonological, morphological, syntactic, lexical, and semantic changes that have happened diachronically, while touching upon the literature and culture of the different historical periods. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 315.

LING 667.  English Syntax   (3).

Cross-listed as ENGL 667. Studies the basic principles of English syntax, covering the major facts of English sentence construction and relating them to linguistic theory. Prerequisite: ENGL 315/LING 315 or equivalent, or departmental consent.

LING 668.  Field Methods of Linguistics   (3).

Cross-listed as ENGL 668. Students learn how to collect and analyze data from a language unknown to them by interacting with a native speaker – course language consultant. Students gain some familiarity with the phonetics, phonology, morphology and syntax of the language, while developing techniques for studying an unfamiliar language more generally and for managing the data collected. Course includes diversity content. Repeatable three times for a total of 9 credit hours. Prerequisite: ENGL 315/LING 315.

LING 672.  Dialectology   (3).

Cross-listed as ENGL 672. Introduces the study of language variety, emphasizing regional and social dialect in America and methods of studying it. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: LING 315/ENGL 315 or departmental consent.

LING 720.  Seminar in Old English   (3).

Cross-listed as ENGL 720. Advanced course in Old English language and literature. Studies the Old English language in enough detail to enable the reading of some prose and poetry, including parts of Beowulf and the elegiac poems in the original. Some literature, including all of Beowulf, is read in translation. Particular attention is given to close reading and interpretation of the text, and to important literary and cultural features of the period and its Norse heritage. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content and departmental consent.

LING 740.  Graduate Studies in Linguistics   (3).

Selected topics in theories of language and methods of linguistic study. Repeatable for credit with departmental consent.