ARTH - Art History

Although there is no graduate degree in art history, the following courses are available.

Courses numbered 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate. (Individual courses may be limited to undergraduate students only.) Courses numbered 800 to 999 = graduate.

ARTH 520.  Seminar In Art History   (1-3).

Systematic study in selected areas of art history. Course content varies but individual areas are not repeatable for credit.

ARTH 526.  Art Since 1945   (3).

General education humanities and fine arts advanced further study course. Art in the United States from 1945 to the present, stressing the relationship between contemporary trends in criticism, theory and artistic practice. Prerequisite: ARTH 124 or instructor's consent.

ARTH 532.  Independent Study in Art History   (1-3).

Work in a specialized area of the study of art history. Directed readings and projects. Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

ARTH 533.  Seminar: Topics in Modern Art   (3).

Selected readings and problems in art of the modern era. Course content varies but individual areas are not repeatable for credit.

ARTH 533AB.  Islamic Art   (3).

Explores the relationship between the Islamic faith and various art forms. Muslim societies have produced artworks of extraordinary vitality and diversity across three continents over the course of 1500 years. Course examines this art thematically. Topics include: introduction to Islam, mosque architecture, calligraphy, Islamic ornament, ceramics, contemporary video/performance art, and more. Students gain a greater familiarity with the vibrant Islamic community in Wichita through guest speakers, field trips, and cultural exchanges.

ARTH 533AC.  Curation and Installation of “Do It” Exhibition   (3).

This hands-on, applied learning course explores all the possibilities for working in a museum environment. Students collaborate closely with the staff of the Ulrich Museum of Art to curate the upcoming Do It exhibition, choosing works, installing the show, designing publicity materials and helping with events planning.

ARTH 533AF.  Realism/Activism/Prints   (3).

Working closely with the director of the Ulrich Museum of Art and the museum’s notable collection of works on paper, students explore regional and national printmakers of the past century who engaged in social activism. Students have the opportunity to view firsthand the works discussed in the class, and to research and write critically about those works for an exhibition at the Ulrich Museum of Art the following semester.

ARTH 533AG.  Contemporary Sculpture   (3).

This class will address selected works of sculpture from the modern and contemporary period. Emphasis will be placed on major artists and movements, such as cubism and minimalism. This course will help students identify stylistic differences between these movements and place them in their larger socio-historical contexts, allowing students to understand why different artists developed different styles or subject matters at different times.

ARTH 533AI.  History of Photography   (3).

Explores the major conceptual, ideological and cultural issues that have impacted the history of photography from the 19th century to the present. Emphasizes the sociopolitical forces, technological developments and aesthetic innovations that have determined the trends of photographic theory and production.

ARTH 546.  Modernism II   (3).

Explores a changing array of social, cultural, political and medium-specific issues that have impacted the development of modern art and design and the notion of modernism as an important theoretical term. Themes, topics and artistic/design-based references in this class change and respond to current debates and dialogues informing art and design practice. Requires in-depth research and analysis in oral and written communication. Prerequisites: ARTH 346, graduate standing, or instructor's consent.

ARTH 547.  Themes in Contem Art/Design II   (3).

Explores the historical foundations of contemporary art and design, as well as the various social cultural, political and medium-specific issues that influence creative citizenship, contemporary practices, theories of postmodernism and globalization, existing and emerging exhibition strategies, and changing audiences and environments. Themes, topics and artistic/design-based references of this class change and respond to current debates and dialogues. Note: This course offers an undergraduate section under the number ARTH 347. Prerequisites: ARTH 347, graduate standing, or instructor’s consent.

ARTH 550B.  Contemporary Art & Technology   (3).

Examines the role of mechanical, electronic and digital technologies in the creative practices of the late 20th and 21st centuries with emphasis on Europe and North America. Beginning with kinetic and moving to cybernetically inspired art, this course explores early uses of computer technology, including early experiments in synthetic video and interactivity. Critical investigations of new media art such as computer games, bio and sound art, and art for mobile devices, as well as examinations of new media arts beyond Western traditions are integral parts of the course. Prerequisites: ARTH 125A-Z and at least one 300-level ARTH course; or instructor's consent.

ARTH 560G.  Art and Surveillance   (3).

Considers how the concept of The Body, Space and Place as well as Archive intersect with surveillance. Course comprises three key components: First, how artists have responded to old and new surveillance methods that codify our ideas of gender/sexuality, race/ethnicity, and religion. Second, how artists have responded to old and new surveillance methods that shape our relationship with space in its various forms including public/private, national/international/transnational, and digital environments. Third, how artists have addressed personal, institutional, military and governmental archives as forms of surveillance. Also examines related cultural theory and contemporary issues. Students engage with these ideas through three creative projects-one for each of the focal areas of this course. Students working in any artistic discipline are welcome; no photo experience required.

ARTH 587.  Theories of Art History and Culture II   (3).

Explores a range of theoretical models from various cultures and periods that have been used to better understand, contextualize, interpret and analyze visual culture and a range of art and design practices. Structuralism, poststructuralism, modernism, postmodernism, cultural theory (including postcolonial theory, queer theory and feminism), material theory, aesthetics, and theories of connoisseurship are discussed as contributing influences to successful creative practice and useful tools for its subsequent interpretation. Note: This course offers an undergraduate section under the number of ARTH 387. Prerequisites: ARTH 387, graduate standing, or instructor’s consent.

ARTH 732.  Independent Study in Art History   (1-3).

Work in specialized area of the study of art history. Directed readings and projects for graduate students in all disciplines. Prerequisite: instructor's consent.