ENGL - English

Courses numbered 99 or below do not count toward any degree program.

Courses numbered 100 to 299 = lower-division; 300 to 499 = upper-division; 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate.

ENGL 011.  Syntax, Logic and Organization   (3).

Reviews the basic elements of written English. Students write paragraphs and short essays. Combines lecture, small-group discussion and individual tutoring. For students whose ACT-English scores or placement test scores do not qualify them for ENGL 101. Graded Cr/NCr. Credit not applied for graduation.

ENGL 013.  Basic Skills for ESL I   (3).

Teaches the fundamental elements of written and spoken English, emphasizing the acquisition of basic grammatical and syntactical structures and the writing of paragraphs and short essays. Graded Cr/NCr. Credit not applied for graduation.

ENGL 015.  Basic Skills for ESL II   (3).

Extends the skills developed in ENGL 013. Students continue to practice using basic grammatical and syntactical structures, work on reading comprehension skills, and continue to master essay structure. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisite: ENGL 013 or satisfactory score on placement test. Credit not applied for graduation.

ENGL 100.  English Composition   (3).

General education foundation course. A required composition course for non native-speaking students scoring below a certain level as determined by a departmental placement examination or ACT scores. Emphasizes reading and writing skills appropriate to academic discourse. Integrates the writing process, rhetorical modes and library skills into writing assignments related primarily to nonfiction readings. Prerequisites: Qualifying score on ACT or placement exam, or successful completion of ENGL 013 or ENGL 015. Substitutes as ENGL 101 for non native-speaking students.

ENGL 101.  College English I   (3).

General education foundation course. Focuses on developing reading and writing skills appropriate to academic discourse. Integrates the writing process, rhetorical modes and library skills into writing assignments related primarily to nonfiction readings. Prerequisite: qualifying score on ACT or placement exam, or successful completion of ENGL 011.

ENGL 102.  College English II   (3).

General education foundation course. Emphasizes critical reading, research and argumentation. ENGL 102 should be taken after ENGL 101 in the freshman year. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 with a C or better.

ENGL 150.  Workshop   (1-4).

Repeatable for credit. Material varies according to the needs of students.

ENGL 152.  Language of Food   (3).

General education introductory course. Cross-listed as LING 152. Examines how the way we talk about food offers a window into history, psychology, culture and economics. Students are asked to think critically about language and taste as well as to explore the hidden meanings and influence of the language that surrounds us. Analyzes the language of food through menus, recipes, Yelp reviews, TV food shows, as well as the history and etymology of food words. Examples are drawn from American, African, Asian food and culture and beyond. Course includes diversity content.

ENGL 210.  Composition: Business, Professional and Technical Writing   (3).

Provides instruction and practice in writing the kinds of letters, memos, instructions and reports required in the professional world of business and industry. Emphasizes both formats and techniques necessary for effective and persuasive professional communication. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102 or instructor's consent.

ENGL 210BA.  Professional Writing Badge: Crafting Your Resume and Cover Letter   (0.5).

Emphasizes how to successfully compose a professional resume and cover letter. Using open educational learning materials, students learn how to write concise and professional business documents that are directly applicable to the field of business. Students also learn about the proper composition of these documents, discuss them with their peers, and ultimately produce a resume and cover letter of their own. May be "stacked" with ENGL 210BB, 210BC, 210BD, 210BE and 210BF for ENGL 210 credit. Graded Bg/NBg.

ENGL 210BB.  Professional Writing Badge: Professional Correspondence, Emails and Memos   (0.5).

Emphasizes how to successfully compose professional correspondence including emails and memos. Using open educational learning materials, students learn the basics of audience-specific, professionally written communication for paper and paperless correspondence. In addition to understanding best-practices for a variety of approaches, students learn how to avoid common errors and misunderstandings. May be "stacked" with ENGL 210BA, 210BC, 210BD, 210BE and 210BF for ENGL 210 credit. Graded Bg/NBg.

ENGL 210BC.  Professional Writing Badge: Writing for Social Media   (0.5).

Emphasizes how to successfully write for various social media. Using open educational learning materials, students learn how to develop a unique and professional social media tone directly applicable to their field of business. Students also learn about the proper written composition for social media, discuss written social media opportunities, and ultimately produce a professional blog of their own. May be "stacked" with ENGL 210BA, ENGL 210BB, ENGL 210BD, ENGL 210BE, ENGL 210BF for ENGL 210 credit. Graded Bg/NBg.

ENGL 210BD.  Professional Writing Badge: Editing Social Media   (0.5).

Emphasizes how to successfully edit personal social media accounts to highlight professionalism. Using open educational learning materials, students learn how to analyze personal social media accounts for unprofessionalism in images and text. Students also learn about professional social media accounts and how they can be used in job searches and for professional networking. May be "stacked" with ENGL 210BA, ENGL 210BB, ENGL 210BC, ENGL 210BE, ENGL 210BF for ENGL 210 credit. Graded Bg/NBg.

ENGL 210BE.  Professional Writing Badge: Researching Grants that Apply to You   (0.5).

Explores ways to successfully research and identify grants that apply to the student’s professional career. Using open educational learning materials, students learn about different resources available to them for grant research. Students also learn how to identify the most applicable grants for them or their company. At the conclusion of the course, students create a grant writing action plan they would potentially like to complete for one of the grants they have identified. May be "stacked" with ENGL 210BA, ENGL 210BB, ENGL 210BC, ENGL 210BD and ENGL 210BF for ENGL 210 credit. Graded Bg/NBg.

ENGL 210BF.  Professional Writing Badge: Presenting Online   (0.5).

Emphasizes how to successfully complete an online presentation. Using open educational learning materials, students learn to prepare presentation materials. Students also learn about the proper etiquette of online presentations, discuss etiquette with their peers, and ultimately complete a successful online presentation for their instructor. May be "stacked” with ENGL 210BA, ENGL 210BB, ENGL 210BC, ENGL 210BD, ENGL 210BE for ENGL 210 credit. Graded Bg/NBg.

ENGL 221.  Chaucer & the Medieval World   (3).

General education introductory course. An introduction to Medieval literature and culture, introducing a variety of literary stories and genres representative of the social, economic and literary background of the late 14th century in England. Reading includes selected "Canterbury Tales" (in facing page translation), along with contextual readings in social history and chronicle. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102.

ENGL 230.  Exploring Literature   (3).

General education introductory course. Instruction in the critical reading of literature in its major traditional periods or genres (especially drama, fiction and poetry). Pre- or corequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 232.  Themes in American Literature   (3).

General education introductory course. Instruction in critical reading and writing about representative works of American fiction, poetry, drama and the essay. Emphasizes understanding and appreciation of central themes and dominant ideas. Pre- or corequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 232D.  Themes in American Literature: Literature in the Jazz Age   (3).

General education introductory course. Instruction in critical reading and writing about representative works of American fiction, poetry, drama and the essay. Emphasizes understanding and appreciation of central themes and dominant ideas. Pre- or corequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 232E.  Themes in American Literature: American Dream   (3).

General education introductory course. Instruction in critical reading and writing about representative works of American fiction, poetry, drama and the essay. Emphasizes understanding and appreciation of central themes and dominant ideas. Pre- or corequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 232K.  Images of Insanity   (3).

General education introductory course. Instruction in critical reading and writing about representative works of American fiction, poetry, drama and the essay. Emphasizes understanding and appreciation of central themes and dominant ideas. Pre- or corequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 232L.  Asian American Fiction   (3).

General education introductory course. Instruction in critical reading and writing about representative works of American fiction, poetry, drama and the essay. Emphasizes understanding and appreciation of central themes and dominant ideas. Pre- or corequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 232M.  Ecology and the Wild in American Literature   (3).

General education introductory course. Instruction in critical reading and writing about representative works of American fiction, poetry, drama and the essay. Emphasizes understanding and appreciation of central themes and dominant ideas. Pre- or corequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 232OH.  Coming of Age - Honors   (3).

General education introductory course. Instruction in critical reading and writing about representative works of American fiction, poetry, drama and the essay. Emphasizes understanding and appreciation of central themes and dominant ideas. Pre- or corequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 232P.  Images of Women in 20th Century Literature   (3).

General education introductory course. Instruction in critical reading and writing about representative works of American fiction, poetry, drama and the essay. Emphasizes understanding and appreciation of central themes and dominant ideas. Pre- or corequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 232R.  Horror and the Supernatural   (3).

This survey course looks at classic and contemporary works of horror and the supernatural, emphasizing themes and ideas common to the genre. This course will examine various forms of literature, including fiction, poetry, short stories, plays, graphic novels, and film. The emphasis in this course is on style and character analysis. Prerequisites: ENG 101, 102, and/or instructor's consent.

ENGL 233.  The Great Books: An Introduction   (3).

General education introductory course. An intensive reading of some of the foundational texts of the humanities, focusing on literary texts, but also incorporating major works of history, philosophy, theology and other areas of the liberal arts, from the classical period to today. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102.

ENGL 240.  Introduction to Shakespeare   (3).

General education introductory course. Surveys the plays and poetry of William Shakespeare, with attention to their literary and historical contexts, recent stage and film adaptations, and Shakespeare's continuing influence on popular culture. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102.

ENGL 241.  Jane Austen & Popular Culture   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Explores adaptations of Jane Austen's novels in relation to the literary works on which they are based. Students are introduced to recent theories of adaptation and investigate adaptations of Austen's novels in both established genres, such as film, fiction and drama, and emerging genres, such as web series and role-playing games. Students are required to develop their own adaption of literary work. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102, and/or instructor's consent.

ENGL 254.  Modern British Literature   (3).

A survey of important works by major writers of the British Isles, including Ireland, in the 20th century. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 273.  Science Fiction   (3).

General education introductory course. Survey of key classic and contemporary works of science fiction and speculative literature, emphasizing themes and ideas common in the genre and its subgenres. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102.

ENGL 276.  The Literature of Sports   (3).

General education introductory course. Introduces the general education student to interpretations and representations of sports as a cultural phenomenon. Readings may include fictional and nonfictional texts and films. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102.

ENGL 277.  The Detective Story   (3).

General education introductory course. Introduction to detective fiction, covering classic authors in the genre such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie, as well as contemporary authors, films and graphic novels, with emphasis on the genre's larger social and historical concerns. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102.

ENGL 278.  Literary Representations of LGBTQ + Culture   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Looks at LGBTQ+ fiction through various forms of literature, including novels, poetry, short stories, graphic novels and films. Emphasizes close-reading techniques and character and style analysis. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102, and/or instructor's consent.

ENGL 285.  Introduction to Creative Writing   (3).

An introductory course; the techniques and practice of imaginative writing in its varied forms, primarily literary poetry and fiction. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102.

ENGL 301.  Fiction Writing   (3).

Primary emphasis on student writing of literary fiction. Students study form and technique by reading published works and apply those studies to the fiction they write. Course may be repeated once for a total of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 285 with a B- or better.

ENGL 303.  Poetry Writing   (3).

Primary emphasis on student writing of literary poetry. Students study form and technique by reading published works and apply those studies to the poetry they write. Course may be repeated once for a total of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 285 with a grade of B- or better.

ENGL 305.  Creative Nonfiction Writing   (3).

Primary emphasis is on student writing of imaginative nonfiction. Students study form and technique by reading published classical and contemporary works and applying those studies to the essay, the travel essay, the essay of place and nature writing. Course may be repeated once for a total of 6 hours credit. Course limit: 15. Prerequisite: ENGL 285 with a grade of B- or better.

ENGL 307.  Narrative in Literature and Film   (3).

Explores the relationship between literature and film, addresses theoretical and practical issues involved in adaptation, and offers case studies of adaptations of novels, short stories, plays and nonfiction works. Provides comprehensive analysis of the narrative, historical and stylistic contexts in which the adaptation of texts to screen takes place. Prerequisites: ENGL 102, one college-level literature or film course.

ENGL 310.  Nature of Poetry   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Acquaints the student with the variety of poetic forms and techniques. Notes contributions of culture, history and poetic theory as background to the works under study, but primarily emphasizes the characteristics of poetry as a literary communication. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 315.  Introduction to English Linguistics   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Cross-listed as LING 315. Introduction to linguistic principles, including phonological and grammatical concepts.

ENGL 316.  English Sentence Structure   (3).

Cross-listed as LING 316. The basic rules of English syntax, specifically designed for prospective teachers of English but open to all students interested in English sentence structure.

ENGL 317.  History of the English Language   (3).

Cross-listed as LING 317. Linguistic and cultural development of English. Specifically designed for prospective English teachers, but open to all interested students. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 315 or departmental consent.

ENGL 318.  Dialectology   (3).

Cross-listed as LING 318. An introduction to the study of regional and social dialects of English. The relationship between language and factors such as socioeconomic class, social networks, sex, nationalism and geography. Course includes diversity content.

ENGL 320.  The Nature of Drama   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Acquaints the student with drama as a form of literary expression. While introducing a variety of plays drawn from different cultures and historical periods, course focuses on the characteristics of drama, giving some attention to dramatic history and theory. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 322.  Origins of Western Literature   (3).

General education advanced further study course. A study of the literary forms that first appear in classical and Biblical literature and reappear in the English literary tradition. Readings from mythology, the classics and selected books of the Bible. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 323.  World Literature   (3).

General education advanced further study course. A survey of major works of European, African, Asian and South American writers. The aim of the course is to deepen appreciation and understanding of individual works, to examine their relationship to other literature in their tradition, and to achieve a sense of each work as an expression of the culture that originated it. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 330.  The Nature of Fiction   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Acquaints the student with narrative fiction in a variety of forms: the short story, short novel and novel. Covers works of fiction drawn from different cultures and historical periods; focuses on the characteristics of fiction, giving some attention to historical development and to theories of fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 340.  Shakespeare   (3).

General education advanced further study course. A survey of the plays and poetry of William Shakespeare, read with attention to the historical and cultural contexts of his time. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 344.  Regional Literature   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Introduces students to the literature of a particular regional culture or cultures (e.g., literature of the American South, New England regionalism) and examines how that literature relates to a larger national (American or British) tradition. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 345.  Studies in Comparative Literature   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Studies representative works in the Western and ancient Near Eastern literary traditions emphasizing the contrasting relations between themes, types and structures. Readings may be drawn from one or several periods and may include works of fiction, drama, poetry, epic, romance, satire and other types. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 346.  American Multicultural Literature   (3).

Provides broad exposure to the literature of various cultures in the U.S., including African-American, Native-American, Asian-American, Chicana/o and immigrants from other cultures. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102.

ENGL 347.  World Comparative Literature   (3).

Focuses on emergent, contemporary literatures written in or translated into English from Africa, Asia, Australia, the Pacific and the Americas. Texts may include novels, poetry, plays, essays, films and other forms of creative expression. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102.

ENGL 360.  Major British Writers I   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Covers the primary writers in British literature from the beginnings through the 18th century. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 361.  Major British Writers II   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Covers the primary writers in British literature from the 19th century to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 362.  Major American Writers I   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Covers important works of American writers from the beginnings to the end of the 19th century. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 363.  Major American Writers II   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Covers important works of American writers from the end of the 19th century to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 365.  African-American Literature   (3).

General education advanced further study course. A survey course; acquaints the student with the most significant African-American writers from the 1700s to the present. Covers early slave narratives and early slave poetry to the Harlem Renaissance; student reading, discussion and writing begin with the Harlem Renaissance and end with the 1970s. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 375.  Popular Literature   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Studies various forms of popular literature (e.g., revolutionary literature, science fiction, Western fiction, detective novel) emphasizing both the literary merit of the works and the way they reflect popular tastes and values. Repeatable for credit with change of content. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 377.  Graphic Novels   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Introduces students to the history of sequential art and graphic novels. Explores social, cultural and aesthetic issues related to the form. Emphasizes the literary merit of the works and their relationship to other literary forms.

ENGL 380.  Special Topics   (1-3).

Topic selected and announced by individual instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 390.  The Bible as Literature   (3).

Studies the Bible as a literary artifact through extensive readings in both Old and New Testaments. Points out literary techniques and discusses their meaning for the manner of composition of the Bible. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.

ENGL 401.  Fiction Workshop   (3).

Advanced course. Manuscripts are critiqued to develop skill in writing, rewriting, and polishing literary fiction. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 301.

ENGL 403.  Poetry Workshop   (3).

Advanced course. Manuscripts are critiqued to develop skill in writing, rewriting and polishing literary poetry. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 303.

ENGL 481.  Cooperative Education   (1-3).

Provides the student with practical experience, under academic supervision, that complements and enhances the student's academic program. Individual programs must be formulated in consultation with appropriate faculty sponsors and approved by departmental consent. Graded Cr/NCr.

ENGL 503.  American Literature I   (3).

The major fiction, poetry and nonfiction prose of the classic American period. Discussions may include the historical evolution of American letters, the development of the novel and romance, the transcendental period, and the rise of Western and regional literatures. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course.

ENGL 504.  American Literature II   (3).

Fiction, poetry and drama from the late 19th century to after World War II. Readings also may include literary criticism and other types of nonfiction prose. Discussions cover themes, topics and literary forms inspired by the social and cultural movements and events of the first half of the 20th century. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course.

ENGL 508.  Critical Studies in Film   (3).

Subjects announced each semester. Intensive analysis of a particular film genre, period, director or theme, giving special attention to the historical, cultural, theoretical and technical contexts in which the films were made. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content. Prerequisites: ENGL 102, one college-level literature or film course.

ENGL 512.  Studies in Fiction   (3).

Subjects announced each semester. Repeatable once for credit. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course.

ENGL 512C.  Studies in Fiction: The Supernatural   (3).

Subjects announced each semester. Repeatable once for credit. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course.

ENGL 513.  Studies in Poetry   (3).

Subjects announced each semester. Repeatable once for credit. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course.

ENGL 514.  Studies in Drama   (3).

Subjects announced each semester. Repeatable once for credit. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course.

ENGL 515.  Studies in Shakespeare   (3).

Subjects announced each semester. Repeatable for credit, except by students who take ENGL 340. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course, or instructor's consent.

ENGL 516.  Studies in a Major Author   (3).

Designed to allow in-depth study of the works of a major American or British author, emphasizing the development of that author's art and considering the work from a variety of critical perspectives.

ENGL 517.  Scriptwriting I   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Cross-listed as THEA 516. The writing of scripts for performance. Emphasizes both verbal and visual aspects of scriptwriting. If possible, the scripts are given in-class readings by actors. Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

ENGL 518.  Scriptwriting II   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Cross-listed as THEA 517. The writing of scripts for performance. Emphasizes both verbal and visual aspects of scriptwriting. If possible, the scripts are given in-class readings by actors. Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

ENGL 520.  Epic and Romance   (3).

Readings in classic and early Western narratives, beginning with Homer's Bronze-Age epic and ending with late medieval romance. Examines the literary conventions and cultural assumptions that typify these works. Pays particular attention to the historical shift in interest from epic to romance as a reflection of broad changes, not only in literary form and content, but also in social customs and worldview. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course.

ENGL 521.  Medieval Literature   (3).

Works by writers of the eighth to 15th centuries, often thematically or historically focused. Readings may include lyric poetry, epic, romance, saga and drama. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course, or instructor's consent.

ENGL 522.  Renaissance Literature   (3).

Works by writers of the 16th through the mid-17th centuries, often thematically or historically focused. Readings may include poetry, drama, fiction and nonfiction prose. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course, or instructor's consent.

ENGL 524.  Restoration and 18th Century Literature   (3).

Works by writers of the late 17th through the 18th centuries, often thematically or historically focused. Readings may include poetry, fiction, drama and nonfictional prose. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course, or instructor's consent.

ENGL 526.  Romantic Literature   (3).

Works by writers of the late 18th and/or early 19th centuries, often thematically or historically focused. Readings may include fiction, poetry, drama, and/or literary criticism or other nonfiction prose. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course, or instructor's consent.

ENGL 527.  Victorian Literature   (3).

Works by writers of the mid to late 19th century, often thematically or historically focused. Readings may include fiction, poetry, drama, and/or literary criticism or other nonfiction prose. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course, or instructor's consent.

ENGL 532.  Modern British Literature   (3).

Irish and English literature of the 20th century. Subjects announced each semester. Repeatable once for credit with change of topic. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course.

ENGL 533.  Contemporary Literature   (3).

Modern literature, primarily British and American, since 1950. Subjects announced each semester. Repeatable once for credit. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course.

ENGL 536.  Writing by Women   (3).

Cross-listed as WOMS 536. Explores various themes in critical approaches to literature composed by women writers, especially those whose works have been underrepresented in the literary canon. Genres and time periods covered, critical theories explored, and specific authors studied vary in different semesters. Course includes diversity content.

ENGL 540.  Introduction to Critical Theory   (3).

Introduces students to critical literary theory. Topics may include readings in gender theory, historicism, psychoanalytical theory, cultural criticism, Marxism, reader-response theory and deconstruction. May also offer a survey of classical and early-modern critical methodologies from Plato to the formalist schools of the early 20th century. Prerequisites: English 102 and/or instructor's consent.

ENGL 546.  Studies in Ethnic Literature   (3).

The study of literature by a specific ethnic group or groups in the United States or Great Britain. Content varies by instructor, and subjects are announced each semester. Fosters an appreciation for the unique literary tradition of a distinct ethnic group or groups and gives students some understanding of the larger historical and national contexts in which that tradition emerged. Course includes diversity content. Repeatable once for credit with a change in topic. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college-level literature course.

ENGL 550.  Independent Reading   (1-3).

For majors and nonmajors who wish to pursue special reading or research projects in areas not normally covered in coursework. Repeatable once for credit. Prerequisites: ENGL 102 and departmental consent.

ENGL 560.  Grammar and Style in Composition   (3).

Explores writing at the sentence and paragraph levels. Students learn to craft stylish, surprising and impactful sentences and paragraphs suited to various kinds of writing. Examines the social, cultural and political dimensions of English usage, such as correctness, the teaching of grammar, and new writing technologies. Because of its combined emphases on practice and theory, this course should appeal both to students who wish to enhance their writing skills and to those interested in teaching English. Prerequisites for undergraduates: English 101 and 102.

ENGL 576.  Advanced Studies in the Graphic Novel   (3).

General education advanced further study course. Designed to allow in-depth study of the graphic novel with special emphasis on critical responses. Readings may be thematically or historically focused. Prerequisites: junior standing, ENGL 377, and at least one other college literature course or instructor's consent.

ENGL 580.  Special Studies   (1-3).

Topic selected and announced by the individual instructor. Repeatable once for credit. Prerequisites: junior standing and one college literature course or departmental consent.

ENGL 581.  Composition Practicum   (1).

Required for all teaching assistants in English. Does not count for credit toward the MA or MFA degree. Focuses on techniques and strategies for teaching composition. Each participant enrolls in the syllabus group appropriate to the composition course he or she teaches. Repeatable for credit. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: appointment as a graduate teaching assistant in the department of English.

ENGL 585.  Writer's Tutorial: Prose Fiction   (3).

Tutorial work in creative writing in literary fiction with visiting writer. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of creative writing director.

ENGL 586.  Writer's Tutorial: Poetry   (3).

Tutorial work in creative writing in literary poetry with visiting writer. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of creative writing director.

ENGL 590.  Senior Seminar   (3).

In-depth study of a specialized literary topic. Emphasis is on focused readings, interactive debate, individual research and the presentation of research reports and essays. Topics vary according to the specialization of the instructor. This is a required capstone course for the English major and should be taken during a student's final year of study. Prerequisite: completion of 18 hours toward the major. Not available for graduate credit.

ENGL 665.  History of the English Language   (3).

This course offers an in-depth historical study of the English language by tracing the history of how the language has changed across time. We will consider Old, Middle, Modern, American English, as well as newer World Englishes. We will address the nature and mechanisms of language change over time and the social, political, and other historical conditions related to such changes. The course will focus on the particular phonological, morphological, syntactic, lexical, and semantic changes that have happened diachronically, while touching upon the literature and culture of the different historical periods. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 315.

ENGL 667.  English Syntax   (3).

Cross-listed as LING 667. Studies the basic principles of English syntax, covering the major facts of English sentence construction and relating them to linguistic theory. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 315 or equivalent, or departmental consent.

ENGL 668.  Field Methods of Linguistics   (3).

Cross-listed as LING 668. Students learn how to collect and analyze data from a language unknown to them by interacting with a native speaker – course language consultant. Students gain some familiarity with the phonetics, phonology, morphology and syntax of the language, while developing techniques for studying an unfamiliar language more generally and for managing the data collected. Course includes diversity content. Repeatable three times for a total of 9 credit hours. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 315.

ENGL 672.  Studies in Language Variety   (3).

Cross-listed as LING 672. Introduces the study of language variety with special attention to regional and social dialect in America and methods of studying it. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 315 or departmental consent.

ENGL 680.  Theory and Practice in Composition   (3).

Introduces theories of rhetoric, research in composition and writing programs, and practices in schools and colleges. Students investigate the process of writing, analyze varieties and samples of school writing, and develop their own writing skills by writing, revising and evaluating their own and others' work. Designed especially for prospective and practicing teachers; may not be taken for credit by students with credit in ENGL 780.

ENGL 681.  Editing American English   (3).

Students master the rules and conventions of grammar, sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, usage and mechanics, and learn how to apply them while they are revising and editing a written text. Students work as tutors in the writing center to learn and understand the practical application of editing rules. Includes instruction in the conventions of Editing Standard English (also known as Edited American English) and in methods of effective tutoring. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102.

ENGL 686.  Professional, Technical and Scientific Writing and Editing   (3).

Introduces students to editing and writing in professional, scientific, technical and medical fields. Through careful reading and analysis of exemplary technical and scientific documents, students gain exposure to numerous writing genres produced for different audiences and contexts. They practice writing in several forms, which may include research summaries, press releases, procedures, specifications, infographics, public service announcements, fact sheets and popular science writing. Assignments help strengthen students' rhetorical awareness, as well as the precision, clarity and readability of their writing.

ENGL 700.  Introduction to Graduate Study in English   (3).

Prepares students to perform effectively in graduate classes in English. Covers: (1) basic bibliographical tools; (2) terminology both technical and historical; (3) various approaches to the study of literature, such as intrinsic analysis of a literary work, the relationships of biography to literary study, and the relevance of other disciplines, such as psychology, to literature; and (4) the writing of interpretative and research essays. Maintains a balance between criticism and research throughout the semester. Fulfills the university's professional and scholarly integrity training requirement covering research misconduct, publication practices and responsible authorship, conflict of interest and commitment, ethical issues in data acquisition, management, sharing and ownership for students who receive a grade of B or better.

ENGL 703.  Seminar in American Literature I   (3).

Advanced study of major issues and themes in fiction, poetry and nonfiction prose from the early American period to the Civil War, with attention to the social and cultural contexts that shaped the literary history of the colonial period and the early nation. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 704.  Seminar in American Literature II   (3).

Advanced study of major issues and themes in fiction, poetry and nonfiction prose from the post-bellum period to 1920, with attention to the social and cultural contexts that shaped such trends as realism and modernism. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 705.  Seminar in American Literature III   (3).

From 1920 to 1970. Advanced study of major issues and themes in fiction, poetry and nonfiction prose from 1920 to the contemporary period, with attention to the social and cultural contexts that shaped such trends as modernism and postmodernism. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 712.  Graduate Studies in Fiction   (3).

Selected topics in the development of the form and content of prose fiction. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 713.  Graduate Studies in Poetry   (3).

Selected topics in forms, techniques and history of poetry. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 714.  Graduate Studies in Drama   (3).

Selected topics in the history and nature of dramatic literature. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 715.  Seminar in Chaucer   (3).

Advanced study of Chaucer's major works. Readings are in Middle English and include selections from the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, the dream visions, the lyrics, and a limited number of comparative readings in other late 14th century authors such as Langland, the Gawain-Poet and Gower. Emphasis is placed on close reading and interpretation of the text, and on the historical context of Chaucer's work, which involves study of subjects such as the black plague, the peasants' revolt, guilds, fairs, chivalry, trade and healing. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 720.  Seminar in Old English   (3).

Cross-listed as LING 720. Advanced course in Old English language and literature. Studies the Old English language in enough detail to enable the reading of some prose and poetry, including parts of Beowulf and the elegiac poems in the original. Some literature, including all of Beowulf, is read in translation. Particular attention is given to close reading and interpretation of the text, and to important literary and cultural features of the period and its Norse heritage. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 721.  Seminar in Medieval Literature   (3).

Advanced study of selected works from old and middle English literature and continental literature of the medieval period, with an emphasis on close reading as well as the social and cultural context of the readings. Content varies at the discretion of the instructor. Readings may include epic, romance, drama, lyric and satire, as well as examples of discourse — oratory, history, memoir, political writings, philosophy — and major works and authors such as Beowulf, Cynewulf, Wulfstan, Chretien de Troyes, Marie de France, Chaucer, the Gawain-Poet and Malory. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 722.  Seminar in Renaissance Literature   (3).

Advanced study of works by important writers of the 16th and earlier 17th centuries. Content varies at the discretion of the instructor. Offerings may be thematically or historically focused, and may include poetry, drama, fiction or nonfiction prose. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 724.  Seminar in Restoration and 18th Century British Literature   (3).

Advanced study of major selected works and authors of the period between 1660 and 1789, covering the crucial genres of drama, poetry, the essay and the novel. Content varies at the discretion of the instructor. Study may include satire, political discourse, comedy, tragedy, parody, and/or innovative forms such as the novel and fictionalized biography. Canonical figures such as Congreve, Dryden, Pope, Swift, Fielding and Johnson may figure prominently. Historical contexts are emphasized. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 726.  Seminar in Romantic Literature   (3).

Advanced study of the authors, genres, themes and/or movements in late 18th and early 19th century literature, with content varying at the discretion of the instructor. Possible topics might include Romantic-era women writers, the historical contexts of the French Revolution and British imperialism, the rise of the novel, the canonical Romantic poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron and Keats), the development of mass print culture, and/or representations of sublime landscapes, solitary meditation and European travel. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 728.  Seminar in Modern British Literature   (3).

Advanced study of the authors, genres, themes and/or movements in British literature (1900 to 1980). Possible topics may include the British novelists (Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, Forster, Joyce, Waugh, Greene, Amis, Durrell, Burgess, etc.) and; the British poets (Housman, Yeats, Lawrence, Eliot, Auden, Thomas, Hughes, etc.); the playwrights (Shaw, Beckett, Eliot, Coward, Maugham, etc.). The seminar may also focus on additional poets, novelists and dramatists, such as modernism, postmodernism, etc. Repeatable once for credit with change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 730.  Seminar in Victorian Literature   (3).

Advanced study of the authors, genres, themes and/or movements in Victorian literature (1832-1900). Possible topics might include the Victorian novelists (William Thackeray, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Anthony Trollope, Thomas Hardy, Rudyard Kipling, etc.); the Victorian poets (Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Arthur Hugh Clough, Dante, Gabriel Rossetti, Christina Rossetti, George Meredith, Algernon Charles Swinburne, etc.); the Victorian prose writers (Carlyle, Mill, Newman, Ruskin, Arnold, Pater, etc.). The seminar may also focus on themes within Victorian literature, such as the Young England movement, the Higher Criticism and its effects, the Woman Question, industrialization and labor, or the Victorian Empire. Repeatable once for credit with a change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 733.  Seminar in Contemporary Literature   (3).

Covers selected topics in the literature of the last quarter-century, including literature in translation. Deals with a broad range of authors and genres. Repeatable for credit with change of content and departmental consent. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 700, or permission of English graduate coordinator.

ENGL 780.  Advanced Theory and Practice in Composition   (3).

For teaching assistants in English. Review of new theories of rhetoric, recent research in composition, and new promising developments in composition programs in schools and colleges. Students are given practice in advanced writing problems, situations and techniques and may propose projects for further special study.

ENGL 781.  Cooperative Education   (1-3).

Similar to ENGL 481 in design and content, this course provides the student with practical experience, under academic supervision, that complements and enhances the student's academic program. Individual programs must be formulated in consultation with appropriate faculty sponsors and approved by departmental consent. Graded Cr/NCr. Prerequisites: ENGL 700 and at least 12 total hours in graduate English courses.

ENGL 785.  Current Theories in the Teaching of Writing   (3).

Examines current areas of interest in rhetoric and composition. Specific topics vary from semester to semester but may include digital and multimedia composition; online writing instruction; language diversity; writing program administration; place, space, and embodiment; transfer; and assessment. Students explore the teaching of writing in settings other than first-year composition, such as writing across the curriculum and writing in the disciplines, undergraduate writing majors, and business, technical, and professional writing. Students leave this course with a fuller understanding of current research in rhetoric and composition and the many types of writing instruction available at colleges and universities.

ENGL 787.  Writing and Invention   (3).

Examines invention as a canon of rhetoric, a stage in the writing process, and a product of thinking, writing or making. Students survey theories of invention as they are expressed in rhetorical theory, composition pedagogy, historical works, and/or literature. Students consider the relationships among invention, originality and creativity, and the ways in which these concepts impact the teaching of English.