CLES - Counseling, Educational Leadership, Educational and School Psychology

Courses numbered 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate. (Individual courses may be limited to undergraduate students only.) Courses numbered 800 to 999 = graduate.

CLES 511.  Introduction to School Psychology   (3).

Cross-listed as PSY 511. Introduces students to a career in school psychology. School psychologists work in schools to solve students' academic and behavioral problems through consultation, assessment and intervention. Course examines the roles and functions of school psychologists, the methods used to address students' psychoeducational needs, and the school and community systems within which they operate. Course includes diversity content.

CLES 512.  Exploring Concepts and Careers in Educational Psychology   (3).

Cross-listed as PSY 512. Explores the field of educational psychology and its application in different areas, such as teaching, learning, coaching, training, assessment and research. Introduces students to the wide variety of careers in educational psychology. Also introduces students to the practical application of educational psychology by considering topics such as cognition (problem solving, memory, decision making), behavioral learning principles, motivation, human development, curriculum development, assessment, basic research design, and the role of research. Course includes diversity content.

CLES 710BA.  Badge: Mental Health Supervision   (1).

Provides training in the supervision of mental health practitioners in the State of Kansas. Topics include: the roles and functions of the clinical supervisor; models of clinical supervision; mental health related professional development; methods and techniques in clinical supervision; supervisor relationship issues; cultural issues in clinical supervision; group supervision; legal and ethical issues in clinical supervision; and evaluation of supervisee competence and the supervision process. Course includes diversity content. For graduate credit only. Graded Bg/NBg.

CLES 750.  Workshops in Education   (1-6).

Intensive study of topics related to education. Differing topics are denoted by a letter following the course number (i.e., 750A, 750C, etc.).

CLES 750AB.  Clinical Foundations in Gender and Sexual Diversity   (3).

Supports the student-clinician in building foundational competencies relative to diversities of sexuality and gender. Students work interactively to connect critical exploration of relevant theory and research with their impact and utility across a range of LGBTQ-centering clinical contexts. In order to facilitate the development of readily applicable skills, self-reflection, group discussion, role play, and direct engagement with community stakeholders are core learning components.

CLES 750AC.  Theories of Suicidology for Counselors   (3).

Introduces theories of suicidology, including historical and modern theories. Uses theoretical foundations and related research to prepare future helpers in understanding, assessing, and working with clients presenting with suicidal ideation from an empirically informed perspective. Discusses complexity and intimacy of suicidality and focuses on integrating theories of suicidology within applied counseling practice.

CLES 750AD.  Introduction to Treating Eating Disorders   (3).

Provides an introduction to the characteristics and criteria associated with a variety of forms of disordered eating. Covers anorexia nervosa, bulimia, binge eating disorders, and overeating, among others, and overview key features of their causes, presentation and treatment. Special attention is dedicated to understanding eating disorders in women, men, athletes and multicultural populations. Attention is given to critical factors in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. These include personality features and family characteristics, as well as sexual orientation, sociocultural, genetic and family influences. Further, the medical and physiological consequences of eating disorders are covered. Treatment and prevention strategies for those with eating disorders are also explored.

CLES 750AE.  Counseling Individuals with Disabilities   (3).

Familiarizes counselors with issues relevant to working with individuals with disabilities. Presents counseling techniques and modalities. Uses video, case studies, coached clients, and a variety of hands-on exercises to help students better understand the challenges and opportunities faced by individuals with disabilities.

CLES 750AF.  Psychosocial Aspects of Sports Injury, Illness and Rehabilitation   (3).

Cross-listed as HPS 716. Explores the psychosocial factors related to sport injury and illness and their effects on the rehabilitation process, mostly connected to sports and physical culture. Offers an opportunity to develop critical thinking and applicable skills as students consider the place of injury, illness and pain within the social and psychological worlds of sport. Explores the mechanisms through which psychosocial factors influence sports injury, illness, understanding, prevention, treatment and rehabilitation outcomes.

CLES 750AG.  Counseling Children & Adolescents Through Grief and Loss   (3).

Helps counselors and educators better understand children and adolescents who have experienced many types of loss. Children and adolescents tend to experience loss and express grief differently from adults. Developmentally sound approaches to assisting children and adolescents are presented.

CLES 750AI.  Exploring The Emotional Effects of Music   (1).

Have you ever heard music that transported you to another time and place and elicited an emotional response? This workshop will explore the foundations of music and its potential use in therapeutic contexts.

CLES 750B.  Neurobiology of Play Therapy: How to Improve Our Practice   (1-6).

Reviews basic brain development principles, the impact of social and emotional trauma on the developing brain, and treatment options consistent with the child's current brain functioning through the use of developmental, symptom, and functional history interviews designed to assist the play therapist in appropriate intervention strategies.

CLES 750D.  Using Art to Integrate Social Emotional Learning   (0.5).

Based on practice and research within the mental health field of art therapy, learn how arts integration across academic subjects increases social emotional learning in the classroom with activities that school counselors and educators can adapt for a range of ages and a variety of academic, career and personal/social counseling goals. Introduces the field of art therapy, its history, approaches and applications in meeting Kansas Social, Emotional, and Character Development Model Standards and Common Core. Participants experience how an expressive arts project can facilitate student empowerment through self-expression, and how a shared art experience can promote community building. Obtain useful tools to build integrated lesson plans for the classroom.

CLES 750E.  Art Therapy in Schools: An Introduction   (0.5).

Introduces the field of art therapy, its history, approaches and applications in working with children and adolescents. The expressive arts — visual arts, movement, drama, music and writing — offer countless ways to promote the academic, career and personal/social development of students, which are goals of a comprehensive school counseling program. Customized for educators and counselors, as well as education and counseling students who are interested in strategies to incorporate art therapy into their practice or classroom but is open to anyone seeking an introduction to the field of art therapy. Participants experience hands-on how the creative process of art making can be used for self-care and with students. Participants are introduced to program models in school districts in which school counselors and art therapists work together to address the needs of students with social, emotional, academic and/or behavioral challenges. Please wear casual clothes for art making.

CLES 750F.  Understanding Students Who Have Experienced Trauma and Neglect   (0.5).

Introduction to trauma. Includes different types of trauma and some general impacts of trauma. In addition, students learn about the Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) study; understand how developmental trauma can impact students socially, emotionally and academically; understand some basic Neurosequential Model in Education (NME) concepts, including how the therapy can be a lens through which to view children who are victims of trauma. Students apply NME concepts in order to develop interventions and supports in the classroom.

CLES 750M.  Mindfulness and Acceptance in Therapy   (1-3).

Teach clients how to reboot their brains by using mindfulness and acceptance techniques with individuals, couples and families.

CLES 750N.  Introduction to Educational Psychology   (3).

Introduces students to the field of educational psychology and its application in different areas, such as teaching, learning, coaching, training and assessment. Introduces students to the practical application of educational psychology by considering topics such as the following: cognition (problem solving, memory, decision making), behavioral learning principles, motivation, human development, curriculum development, assessment, basic research design, and the role of research in educational psychology. While these topics are considered, the course also introduces students to careers in educational psychology; many educational psychologists work in K-12 schools, but many also work in higher education, health professions, program evaluation, instructional design (including online instructional design), industry, human resources, military settings, research, counseling, and sports — in any field requiring training, teaching and learning, motivation, assessment or research.

CLES 750O.  Introduction to School Psychology   (3).

Introduces students to the opportunity of a career in school psychology. School psychologists work in schools to solve students’ academic and behavioral problems through consultation, assessment and intervention. Examines the roles and functions of school psychologists, the methods they use to address students’ psychoeducational needs, and the school and community systems within which they operate.

CLES 750P.  Counseling Children and Adolescents   (3).

Prepares counselors to address the specific needs of children and adolescents, with emphasis on developmental needs, specific therapeutic interventions, and common emotional issues. Counseling techniques and treatment planning are included.

CLES 750R.  Advanced Issues in Psychopathology and the DSM   (3).

Designed to assist students in further understanding the diagnoses in the DSM. Students distinguish among similar diagnoses and recognize how they manifest in clients in both community and inpatient settings. Students acquire skills in differential diagnosis and treatment planning, and recognize personality traits and learned behaviors which impact client outcomes. Designed to help students to understand mental health disorders through a variety of frameworks beyond the introductory level.

CLES 750S.  Social Emotional Learning Across the K-12 Curriculum   (3).

While moving towards becoming responsive schools staffed with responsive educators, educators must embrace and fully understand the Social and Emotional standards and look for opportunities to incorporate them into the curriculum in ways that are meaningful for students and seamless for educators. In this course, teachers and other educators explore and apply nonacademic standards to prepare students for success in the ever changing 21st century society.

CLES 750T.  Understanding Students Living in Poverty   (1).

Workshop explores key definitions surrounding the dynamics of poverty and ways to tailor programs to meet students and families where they are. Provides educators with a real-life simulation of poverty situations and gives them an opportunity to discuss their feelings as they navigate the academic life of a student living in poverty.

CLES 750U.  KCA Mental Health Drive In   (0.5).

Encompasses four content areas: (1) Enhancing emotion intelligence effective self care for mental health professionals includes definition of emotional intelligence (EI), increasing emotional intelligence and awareness, and providing operating instructions for optimal human psychological functioning. (2) Strategies for supporting compassionate classrooms and building staff resilience includes compassionate instruction and discipline in the classroom; building a framework for a compassionate curriculum, and fostering resilience to avoid burnout. (3) Making clinical diagnoses using the DSM 5 – assists counselors and other mental health workers to increase their knowledge of the diagnostic criteria in the DSM 5 and improve their skills in diagnosis and treatment planning. (4) Trauma based play therapy – introduces participants to trauma-informed play therapy TM, an evidence-based and neurodevelopmentally appropriate method for working with traumatized children. A final reflective paper is due one week following the course.

CLES 750V.  Social Work in Sports   (3).

Cross-listed as SCWK 611Q. Explores the role of social work practice in serving the holistic needs of an athlete while understanding their involvement in the culture of sport. Explores the vulnerabilities and resiliencies of individuals who participate in youth, secondary, collegiate and professional sports. Provides a foundation for professionals interested in social work practice in sporting environments and begins to prepare social workers to assist athletes at all levels and in various settings.

CLES 750W.  What Counselors and Therapists Need to Know About Psychotropic Medications   (1-3).

Surveys basic neuropharmacology, the effects of various psychotropic drugs, and the actions of drugs used to treat mental disorders. Examines the actions of specific drugs and their effects on behavior and their uses in biological psychiatry. Basic principles of neuropharmacology are covered.

CLES 750X.  KASB BOLD Program   (1-6).

Individuals in this session attend Kansas Association of School Board professional sessions as provided by the organization and complete nondegree graduate credit course requirements.

CLES 750Y.  USA Seminars   (1-6).

Individuals in this session attend USA professional sessions as provided by the organization and complete nondegree graduate credit course requirements.

CLES 750Z.  KSDE Annual Conference   (1-3).

Individuals in this session attend KSDE Annual Conference professional sessions as provided by the organization and complete nondegree graduate credit course requirements.

CLES 801.  Introduction to Educational Research   (3).

Includes (1) the nature of research methodologies, (2) the preparation of research reports, (3) critical reading of research, and (4) ethics and integrity in conducting and reporting research. Fulfills the university's professional and scholarly integrity training requirement covering research misconduct, publication practices and responsible authorship, conflict of interest and commitment, ethical issues in data acquisition, management, sharing and ownership. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

CLES 802.  Theories of Human Development for Counseling Professionals   (3).

Describes what developmental theories are, what they do, where they come from, how they work and how they are used to explain human nature. Uses theoretical assumptions and related research to systematically evaluate developmental theories in terms of their scientific worthiness and their ability to address characteristics of human development. Focuses on those theories which helped shape the way we currently view human development as well as significant new perspectives which may shape the way we view it in the future. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisites: graduate standing, counseling program status, or instructor's consent.

CLES 805.  Professional and Ethical Issues in Clinical Mental Health Counseling   (3).

Focuses on legal and ethical issues confronting community agency, mental health, and rehabilitation counselors. Students engage in dialog throughout the course and work in peer consultation teams to identify and resolve ethical dilemmas and adopt sound ethical and professional practices. Current topics and needs of special populations (e.g., multicultural issues, competence and malpractice, consultation and supervision) are also explored. Course includes diversity content.

CLES 806.  Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling   (3).

Designed for persons pursuing careers in mental health counseling. Topics addressed include the history of mental counseling, an analysis of the current status of the mental health delivery system, and a futuristic look at mental health services. Examines professional organizations, preparation standards, and credentials relevant to the practice of clinical mental health counseling; models and principles of clinical supervision; consultation; management of mental health services and programs, including areas such as administration, finance, managed care and accountability; and ethical and legal standards in clinical mental health counseling. The legal and societal bases of clinical mental health services are explored within a social justice framework. Course includes diversity content.

CLES 810.  Research and Program Evaluation for Counselors   (3).

Focuses on introducing students to important concepts related to research, statistics and program evaluation for counselors. Designed to provide counseling students a foundation that supports the counseling practitioner model. Fulfills the university’s professional and scholarly integrity requirement covering research misconduct, publication practices and responsible authorship, conflict of interest and commitment, and ethical issues in data acquisition, management, sharing and ownership.

CLES 812.  Counseling Student Athletes   (3).

Examines mental health issues that student athletes may encounter such as anxiety, depression, suicidality, eating, body image, substance abuse, and behavioral disorders. Develops effective strategies to address these issues. The impact of culture, gender, SES, sexual orientation, and disability status on student athletes' mental health is also explored. Course includes diversity content.

CLES 813.  Student Athlete Identity Development   (3).

Explores the identity of student athletes including: what it means to be a student athlete; how multicultural factors influence student athlete development; how identity impacts career readiness; and the impact of exit from sport due to injury, retirement or deselection on an athlete's identity. Course includes diversity content.

CLES 860.  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum   (3).

Supervised clinical mental health counseling experience. Minimum of 100 hours of professional counseling service that includes a minimum of 40 hours of direct client contact experience in counseling, with the remainder of hours (60) in indirect client service. CLES 860 builds on the skills learned and practiced in CESP 824 and requires a minimum grade of B in order to move on to the internship course (CESP 949 or CLES 952). Prerequisites: CESP 824 with a grade of B or better within the last 12 months, CESP 803 and departmental consent.

CLES 861.  Behavioral, Social and Emotional Assessment   (3).

Focuses on basic concepts and methods of assessing behavioral, social and emotional functioning of children and adolescents. Students are introduced to varied theoretical approaches to understanding personality and resultant social-emotional functioning. Assessment methods studied include interviewing, observation, inventory instruments, behavior rating scales, and functional behavioral assessment. Includes supervised experience. Prerequisite: CESP 858.

CLES 871.  Foundations of Higher Education   (3).

Explores the basic structures, history and purposes of higher education. In addition to addressing the issues that students identify, the course explores the development of the different systems of higher education, the different missions and goals of colleges and universities, the multiple sectors of higher education, and the roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders. Special attention is paid to the historical development of different institutional types and the experiences and expectations of different institutional and system members.

CLES 872.  Finance and Human Resources in Colleges and Universities   (3).

Provides a basic overview of administrative functions related to funding, allocation and management of human and fiscal resources in higher education. Current practices, issues and challenges related to finance and human resource management in college and university settings are explored. Emphasis is placed on identifying meaning and implications of practices, and applying learning to practical situations as found in the field.

CLES 873.  College Student Development and the Campus Environment   (3).

Explores the history, meaning and implications of student development theories. Emphasizes typologies, person-environment, psycho-social and cognitive theories, and the diversity of student populations served by student affairs. Special focus on the application of theory and how it may provide a springboard for practice and further discovery.

CLES 874.  Legal and Ethical Issues in Higher Education   (3).

Introduces students to the historical and contemporary legal issues affecting higher education in the United States. Designed to touch upon the multiple perspectives and various legal aspects of higher education, as well as to introduce a wide range of current issues. Intended for students in graduate programs emphasizing higher education as well as graduate students throughout the university interested in an introduction to the legal issues that have had an impact on the field of higher education.

CLES 875.  Practicum in Higher Education   (3).

Designed to provide the student with an opportunity for observation and participation in a wide range of higher education leadership professional activities in an approved college setting, and as a means of integrating didactic experiences and information with actual experience under the supervision of qualified practitioners. Prerequisites: any two of CLES 871, 872, 873 or 874.

CLES 876.  Social Justice Issues in Higher Education   (3).

Critically examines inclusion, diversity and equity in higher education. The various identities of students are reviewed and used in analyzing current trends and challenges related to the pursuit of postsecondary education the United States. Course includes diversity content.

CLES 877.  Capstone: Current Issues in Higher Education and Student Affairs   (3).

In-depth and contemporary exploration of critical issues, trends and forces facing and influencing higher education. Addresses the ways in which contemporary institutions respond to critical issues and challenges, as they are set within and often against the dynamic context of social, political and economic forces. To be highly informed and objective, student affairs (and higher education) professionals need to understand the complexities inherent in higher education in the United States. Course goals revolve around helping students comprehend conflicting perspectives related to relevant issues and to develop a critical perspective needed to analyze them. Also emphasizes developing professional identities as student affairs (or higher education) advocates.

CLES 901.  Proseminar I   (3).

Provides new doctoral students an introduction to the field of educational psychology and doctoral studies as a whole. Also designed to introduce students to the CLES faculty, and to help them prepare for program benchmarks. Finally, helps prepare students to take part in doctoral-level discussions of complex educational psychology concepts. Prerequisite: admission to EdD program or instructor’s consent.

CLES 902.  Psychology of Leadership, Persuasion and Influence   (3).

Overview of psychological processes involved in leadership development and their impact on human behavior and performance, including the historical background, evolving conceptions and perspectives with social context and authority-contingencies, their influences on how people view and wield leadership and persuasive influence, and how these conceptions inform everyday reality, institutional/educational and academic practice. Prerequisite: admission to EdD program or instructor’s consent.

CLES 903.  Beliefs About Knowledge and Learning   (3).

Overview of beliefs about the nature of knowledge and learning, including the historical background, evolving conceptions, and their influences on how teachers teach and test. Prerequisite: admission to EdD program or instructor’s consent.

CLES 904.  Psychology of Language and Discourse Processes   (3).

Overview of psychological processes involved in language/discourse comprehension, production and development, including the historical background, evolving conceptions, and their influences on how people view and study language and discourse, and how these psycholinguistic conceptions inform curriculum, classroom and professional practice. Prerequisite: admission to EdD program or instructor’s consent.

CLES 905.  Research Methods and Analysis: Quantitative   (3).

Helps students develop an understanding of quantitative inquiry methods and designs. Course framework is built on the collection of data. This data is the tool with which students build a research study. Students determine the correct research methods, analyze and write up the results in a scholarly way. Prerequisite: admission to EdD program or instructor’s consent.

CLES 906.  Research Methods and Analysis: Naturalistic   (3).

Helps students develop an understanding of naturalistic inquiry methods and designs. Also focuses on analysis of qualitative data. Prerequisite: admission to EdD program or instructor’s consent.

CLES 907.  Cognition and Instruction   (3).

Overview of the study of cognition and an in-depth look at the theories and findings that are most relevant for educational psychology. Prerequisite: admission to EdD program or instructor’s consent.

CLES 908.  Proseminar II   (5).

Weekly seminar for discussing contemporary professional issues related to leadership and research in educational psychology. Focus varies depending on the interest of the students enrolled in the class. Ultimately, this proseminar synthesizes content learned from the core courses in the EdD, contemporary research in leadership in educational psychology, and the students’ professional goals. Prerequisites: CLES 901, 902, 903, 904, 905, 906 and 907.

CLES 909.  Dissertation   (1-5).

Provides students with dissertation proposal and dissertation advisement and may be taken for 1-5 credit hours per semester for a maximum of 15 credit hours, which are counted toward program completion. Prerequisites: CLES 902, 902, 903, 904, 905, 906, 907. Can be taken simultaneously with CLES 908.

CLES 952A.  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship I   (3).

Requires a total of 300 hours in the practice of clinical mental health counseling under clinical supervision. Of the 300 hours, a minimum of 120 hours must be direct counseling service. The student should consider selecting an internship site that offers opportunities to engage in both individual counseling and group work. Clinical settings must be approved and appropriate to the student’s emphasis. The semester prior to enrollment, the student must complete the internship application process. Prerequisites: admission to candidacy, CESP 803, 824, both with a minimum course grade of B. Pre- or corequisite: CESP 821, 825 and CLES 860, both CESP 825 and CLES 860 with a minimum course grade of B.

CLES 952B.  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship II   (3).

Requires a total of 300 hours in the practice of clinical mental health counseling under clinical supervision. Of the 300 hours, a minimum of 120 hours must be direct counseling service. Students should consider selecting internship sites that offer opportunities to engage in both individual counseling and group work. Clinical setting must be approved and appropriate to the student’s emphasis. The semester prior to enrollment, the student must complete the internship application process. Grade assigned will be either “S” Satisfactory (pass) or “U” Unsatisfactory (fail). Prerequisites: admission to candidacy and CLES 952A with a grade of “S” (pass).

CLES 952C.  Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship   (6).

Requires a total of 600 hours in the practice of clinical mental health counseling under clinical supervision. Of the 600 hours, a minimum of 240 hours must be direct counseling service. The student should consider selecting an internship site that offers opportunities to engage in both individual counseling and group work. Clinical settings must be approved and appropriate to the student’s emphasis. The semester prior to enrollment, the student must complete the internship application process. Prerequisites: admission to candidacy, CESP 803, 824, both with a minimum course grade of B. Pre- or corequisites: CESP 821, 825 and CLES 860, both CESP 825 and CLES 860 with a minimum course grade of B.