HIST - History

Courses numbered 100 to 299 = lower-division; 300 to 499 = upper-division; 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate.

HIST 100.  The Human Adventure: World Civilization Since 1500   (3).

General education humanities course. Introductory history of the human experience during the past five centuries, with attention to the major social, cultural, economic and political traditions of Asia, Africa and the Americas as well as Europe. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 101.  World Civilization to 1500   (3).

General education humanities course. Introduces great world civilizations before 1500, both Western (Near East, Greece, Rome, Medieval and Renaissance Europe) and non-Western (China, Japan, India, sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas). Readings help define civilization, stress the individual contributions of each culture to world civilization, and examine the interactions and influences between cultures. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 102.  History of Western Civilization Since 1648   (3).

General education humanities course. Introductory survey of the political, social, cultural and economic developments in Europe from 1648 until the present day that have shaped our world. Covers the development of constitutional democracies, the rise of totalitarian dictatorships, the emergence of mass society and the middle class, and revolutionary developments in politics and technology.

HIST 104.  Topics in World History   (3).

Familiarizes students with creative and/or nontraditional ways of examining world history. Possible topics include how contemporary society uses world history in film, the evolution of social issues through first-person accounts from a variety of cultures across the globe, or other topics and approaches.

HIST 131.  History of the United States: Colonial to 1865   (3).

General education humanities course. Begins with the native peoples who occupied this continent and continues through the Civil War. Explores the origins and development of the United States, including the influence of the Puritans, the struggle for independence, the quest of the 19th century hippies to find utopia, and the challenge to abolish slavery. Examines the formation of our institutions, major political and economic issues, and the expansion of the country's boundaries.

HIST 132.  History of the United States Since 1865   (3).

General education humanities course. Examines the rapid change characterizing the period of U.S. history from the Civil War to the present. Studies the growth of big business, reform movements, and the emergence of the U.S. as a world power. Explores how political, social and economic factors, as well as WWI, WWII, Korea and Vietnam continue to affect Americans and present a challenge to democracy within a growing diverse population that tests traditional institutions.

HIST 150.  Workshops in History   (3).

Workshop on a variety of history topics. Different topics have different letters added to the course number.

HIST 150AA.  Leadership and the Local Community   (3).

This course invites current and future community leaders, as well as other members of the general public, to engage the study of local history as a gateway to learn the skills of local civic and community. Using the framework of the Kansas Leadership Center’s training framework, participants will learn the skills and techniques of doing local and community history and will apply the lessons that “nearby history” can review to address pressing issues and concerns.

HIST 150AB.  Wichita Neighborhoods   (0.5).

The story of Wichita through an exploration of its various neighborhoods. As the city grew and changed, new parts of the city developed. As shifts in population, economics, transportation patterns, and cultural values took place, once prominent and upscale parts of town gained new residents and businesses. Students learn to read a city and the lessons it can teach.

HIST 150AV.  Kansas and World War II—How the War Was Fought Overseas, at Home and in the State’s Factories   (0.5).

Students discuss how World War II impacted Kansas, their own families and themselves. Recognize how the war helped shape Kansas' identify. Examine how - as the crossroads of the nation - Kansans, in many ways, were typical of the heart and soul of a nation.

HIST 150AW.  History in Film   (0.5).

This course provides an overview of how film has entertained, educated and sometimes misrepresented history throughout the last 100 years of cinema. Focuses on ten films and examines the way they impacted audiences, and have become a part of our national consciousness regarding history.

HIST 150AX.  Apocalypse on the Plains: The Locust Plague of 1874   (0.5).

Covers the first of a series of late-19th century locust infestations that would not only destroy crops over millions of acres but would also change the environment, ecology, the economy and the history of the Plains forever.

HIST 150E.  Workshop in Family History   (0.5).

This course introduces students to the basic tools associated with genealogy. Emphasis will be on a variety of online resources available to help a student with their research including vital, census, military, religious and immigration and naturalization records as well as newspapers. This course will emphasize using the computer, internet and storing your family tree using a free internet site, FamilySearch.

HIST 225.  Your Family in History   (3).

Cross-listed as HIST 500. Bridges the gap between history and genealogy through demonstrations of the kinds of research techniques available to those who are interested in creating a family history. Students demonstrate understanding of these techniques in a family history project.

HIST 300.  Introduction to Historical Research and Writing   (3).

Basic hands-on instruction in historical research methodology, writing and criticism. Students do individual research and write articles and book reviews, a lengthy research paper, and critiques of their colleagues' paper drafts. Goal is for students to be capable of conducting historical research and presenting findings in a professional manner. Required of history majors.

HIST 306.  The U.S. Century: Decades of Change   (3).

General education humanities course. Examination of the major social and political events of the turbulent 20th century. Beginning with the assassination of William McKinley, this course explores the U.S. participation in wars, the economic and social crises of the Great Depression, and the reform movements of the "American Century."

HIST 308.  A History of Lost Civilizations   (3).

General education humanities course. A comparative examination of lost civilizations of both the Old World and New World, including the Sumerians, Hittites, Minoans, Mycenaeans, Etruscans, Mohenjo-Daro, Khymers, Incas, Mayas and Aztecs.

HIST 310.  Special Topics in History   (1-3).

May be taken only twice for credit toward a history major.

HIST 310B.  20th Century European History   (3).

This course will entail selected reading in the area of 20th century European history. It will include reading approximately a book each week, a 3-5 page review of each book, and periodic meetings with the professor to discuss the book and reviews.

HIST 314.  English History   (3).

General education humanities course. English history from the beginning of the Stuart period to the present.

HIST 315.  Modern German History   (3).

Surveys German history from the end of the Napoleonic era in 1815 to the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

HIST 317.  The Holocaust   (3).

General education humanities course. Investigates the conditions within European society which led to and ultimately culminated in the murder of approximately six million Jews. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 318.  The Holocaust in Film   (3).

Examines ways the Holocaust has been represented in film and uses the material to evaluate the problematic nature of historical representation in film.

HIST 319.  History Beyond the Headlines   (3).

General education humanities course. Provides students an opportunity to study the historical context of contemporary events around the world. The subject matter is derived completely from current online news sources.

HIST 320.  Russian History Survey   (3).

General education humanities course. A survey of Russian history from A.D. 862 to the present.

HIST 321.  The Vietnam Conflict   (3).

General education humanities course. Studies U.S. participation in Vietnam. Includes the French experience in Indochina, U.S. troop buildup, the Tet Offensive in 1968, and the anti-war movement at home. Examines political factors as well as military strategy, tactics and major battles.

HIST 330.  The Americans: Conflict and Consensus in the Development of American Society and Culture   (3).

General education humanities course. A topical examination of selected historical phenomena and personages in the evolution of American democratic society as interpreted by historians and literati.

HIST 333.  Ethnic American 20th Century   (3).

General education humanities course. Cross-listed as ETHS 334. In-depth study of the ethnic experience in the 20th century. Major historical topics include identity formations, intergenerational conflict, class differentiation and social mobility, the politics of ethnicity, resistance and civil rights movements, the racialization of immigration laws, and transnationalism. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 340.  World War II   (3).

General education humanities course. Introduction to the background and causes of World War II, as well as the military, diplomatic, economic, psychological and scientific dimensions of the war. Considers the legacy of the war in light of the postwar world.

HIST 348.  History of Baseball   (3).

Explores the evolution of America's national pastime and examines the relationship between baseball and the development of American culture, society and character. Examines the development of the sport as a uniquely American game, its heroes and bums, champions and cheaters, fans and critics, labor and owners.

HIST 352.  Classical Mythology   (3).

Cross-listed as GREK 325 and LATN 325. Studies the most important myths of the Greeks and Romans. Includes the stories of creation, the gods and goddesses, the major heroes and important sagas such as Achilles, Odysseus and the Trojan War. Sources are mainly literary, e.g., Homer, Hesiod, Virgil and Ovid, but the course also includes Greek art. All readings in English; requires no previous knowledge of Latin or Greek.

HIST 359.  Greek World   (3).

General education humanities course. Surveys Greek history from the Minoans to Cleopatra. Examines the early relations between the Greeks and other ancient civilizations such as Assyria and Egypt, the birth and decline of democracy in Athens, the world empire of Alexander the Great, and the later influence of Greek culture on the Roman world. Also discusses trade, law and family life.

HIST 362.  The Roman World   (3).

General education humanities course. Surveys Roman history and culture from the Etruscans to Constantine the Great, the first Christian emperor. Examines the history, social structure and economy of Rome and the Roman world to answer the questions: what made Rome great and what led to her eventual decline? Includes warfare, slavery and family life.

HIST 399AA.  History and Rock'n'Roll   (3).

Explores the relationship between music and history. Studying a wide variety of genres, students examine the development of popular music from its rise to prominence in the late 19th century to the present day. Moving across a range of historical and cultural contexts, this course introduces students to various popular music genres — blues, rock’n’roll, punk — as they explore relationships between the production and consumption of popular music and how these traditions work to express given societies and particular historical contexts.

HIST 399AC.  World (Un)Civilizations   (3).

Studies of history tend to focus on major civilizations and empires, but such an approach overlooks the contributions of peoples regarded as “barbarians” or “uncivilized” to the history of the world. This course seeks to rectify this omission, allowing students to consider a few historical cultural complexes that are often marginalized. This course will look particularly at the Celts, nomadic peoples of Central Asia, Polynesians, and Australian Aborigines, considering not only historical contexts but also their use in present-day salient cultural and political discourse. In addition, this course will require students to draw on the methods specific to the disciple of history.

HIST 399AE.  1960s in Europe   (3).

Cross-listed as 599AE. The 1960s evoke considerable debate: were they a period of emancipation? Or were they an era of disorder? This course explores the politics, social movements and cultural phenomenon which emerged during the 1960s in both Eastern and Western Europe. We will pay particular attention to how contemporaries made sense of the changes they were experiencing, and how they strove to translate youthful energy and activism into sustained cultural change. Above all, this course seeks to examine what was the meaning of the 1960s and what were its consequences.

HIST 399AF.  Vietnam Conflict in Film   (3).

Cross-listed as HIST 599AF. A retrospective study of America’s longest and most divisive war. The goal of the course is to compare and contrast Hollywood’s version of the war, which may be highly romanticized and subjective, with what professional historians and documentaries have said. It is anticipated that the students’ knowledge and understanding of the war will be enhanced, and their critical viewing skills sharpened. Students will view a series of film, documentary as well as feature films, that deal with the war. These films will provide an in-depth treatment of several selected topics. Each viewing will be preceded by a lecture providing background and will be followed by class discussion about the merits, accuracy, and interpretation provided in the feature film.

HIST 399X.  Communism and the Cold War in Film   (3).

This course will be an exploration of how the communist regimes of 20th century Europe have been represented on film. It will be a 300-level class with no prior expertise. The goal is for students to learn both about communist societies as well as using film to study history.

HIST 399Y.  Weimar Germany on Film   (3).

This course will introduce students to the history of Weimar Germany as it has been depicted on film. In this course, we will be concerned with the historical nature of the interwar era in Germany and its representation on the silver screen.

HIST 399Z.  Nazism and the Third Reich   (3).

Cross-listed as HIST 599AI. Introduces the history of Nazism in Germany during the 1930s and 1940s. Focuses on the political, social and cultural manifestations of Nazism, and the consequences for both German society and the wider world down to the present day.

HIST 481.  Cooperative Education   (1-3).

The cooperative program covers work done at museums or archival divisions of libraries. Cannot be included for a history major or minor. Prerequisite(s): departmental consent.

HIST 481N.  Internship   (1-3).

Complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment as an intern. Prerequisite(s): departmental consent.

HIST 500.  Your Family in History   (3).

Cross-listed as HIST 225. Bridges the gap between history and genealogy through demonstrations of the kinds of research techniques available to those who are interested in creating a family history. Students demonstrate understanding of these techniques in a family history project.

HIST 501.  American Colonies   (3).

General education humanities course. Colonization of the New World emphasizing the British colonists and their development.

HIST 502.  American Revolution and the Early Republic   (3).

General education humanities course. Examination of selected phases of the Revolutionary, Confederation and Federal periods.

HIST 503.  The Age of Jefferson and Jackson   (3).

General education humanities course. Examines the eras of Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson; that is roughly the period from 1800 to 1850. During that time, the United States experienced tremendous territorial growth, cultural ferment and reform movements, engaged in two major international wars and a number of Indian conflicts, and moved toward the sectional showdown over slavery that culminated in a bloody civil war. Focuses on political, social and military history, as America expanded from the Mississippi River across the North American continent.

HIST 504.  Civil War   (3).

General education humanities course. Explores the origins and history of the bloodiest war this nation has ever fought. Students study antebellum America, focusing on the sectional differences between North and South, the institution of slavery, the abolitionist crusade, and the battlefields of the Civil War.

HIST 505.  The United States, 1865 to 1920   (3).

General education humanities course. Examines the political, economic, social and cultural developments during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. Students read articles, books, and primary documents to trace the experiences of the American nation and people as they transform from a growing nation into a global power with special focus on topics such as Reconstruction, political and economic corruption and reform, industrialization, the development and mechanization of the trans-Mississippi West; the rise of corporations, railroads, cities and the American State; and the challenges of African-Americans, immigrants and women. In the end, students should walk away from the course with a better, more in-depth understanding of the history of, and major historical debates concerning, the Gilded Age and Progressive Era in the United States.

HIST 508.  United States Since 1945   (3).

General education humanities course. In this time period, the United States emerged as a world leader. Although the Cold War became a defining force both at home and abroad, "hot" wars in Korea and Vietnam also produced social, economic and political repercussions in the United Sates. Course explores major issues and events of the period with a focus on international relations, the Civil Rights Movement, and the growth of the imperial presidency.

HIST 509.  The African-American Historical Experience   (3).

Cross-listed as ETHS 381AD. Provides a panoramic examination of the African-American experience. Chronologically, it covers life in Africa before the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present day. It focuses on the social, political and economic development of the transplanted Africans in the United States. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisite(s): junior, senior or graduate status.

HIST 510.  20th Century African American History   (3).

Cross-listed as ETHS 381E. The 20th century witnessed a dramatic transformation of the African-American community. As the century began, the vast majority of African-Americans lived in the rural South. At century's end, the vast majority of African-Americans lived in urban areas across the U.S. Besides the demographic relocation of black America, the 20th century also witnessed the Black Freedom Movement (comprised of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements), which dramatically changed the social, economic and political status of blacks. Course examines these and other aspects of the African-American experience during the pivotal 20th century. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 511.  Women in Early America, 1600-1830   (3).

General education humanities course. Cross-listed as WOMS 511. Focuses on women and gender in U.S. history between 1600 and 1830 by examining the lives, experiences, and interactions with social, political and economic systems of women. Students read articles, books and primary documents that examine women’s experiences from the first colonial contact with Native Americans to the dawn of the first women’s movement in the 19th century. Focuses specifically on colonization, regionalism, the roles of race and ethnicity in the construction of gender, women in religious life, the impact of the American Revolution, Republican Motherhood, and women’s contributions to the public sphere and market economy. In the end, students should walk away with an understanding of women in early U.S. history and of the major historical debates concerning women’s and gender history. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 512.  Women and Reform in America, 1830-Present   (3).

General education humanities course. Focuses on women, gender and reform in U.S. history from 1830 to 2000 by examining the lives, experiences, and interactions with social, political and economic systems of women. Students read articles, books and primary documents that examine women’s experiences from the emergence of a domestic economy in the 1830s to 21st century popular culture with specific focus on topics such as the Cult of True Womanhood, slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, Progressivism, suffrage, WWII, postwar feminism, and popular culture. In the end, students should walk away with an understanding of women in early U.S. history and of the major historical debates concerning women’s and gender history. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 513.  History of United States and the Modern Middle East   (3).

General education humanities course. Introduces U.S. relations with the Middle East from the early 20th century to the present. Discusses the fraught redrawing of the map of the Middle East after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and considers the role of the U.S. in the region, especially focusing on American missionary and business interests in the region before World War II, including the founding of ARAMCO. Examines events in the latter half of the 20th century, including U.S. competition with the Soviets for regional clients and U.S. engagement with regional revolutionary nationalist movements such as those in Israel-Palestine, Iran, Iraq and Libya. Students discuss oil politics, peace processes, approaches to refugees and human rights issues, the rise of Al-Qaeda, attacks of September 11th, and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq that have become the longest wars in U.S. history. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 514.  History of the Modern Middle East   (3).

General education humanities course. Examines the emergence of the Modern Middle East from the Ottoman Era to the present. Begins by examining 19th century institutions and considering Middle Eastern political innovations during the late 19th century, especially those rooted in the emergence of nationalism and transforming expectations for the relationship between governments and the people. Focuses upon these two transformations, tracing them through the 20th century, and examines the impact of colonization, World War I, Palestinian and Israeli nationalism, secular ideologies like Arab nationalism and socialism, Nasserism, Islamism and political revolutions in the region. Course features a wide array of source material beyond the texts including articles, literature, film, music and digital archives. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 515.  Economic History of the United States   (3).

Cross-listed as ECON 627. Analysis of the basic factors in economic growth. Explores agriculture, trade and commerce, industrial development and the changing role of the government in economic activity. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201 and junior standing.

HIST 517.  United States Constitutional History to 1865   (3).

General education humanities course. The evolution of the American constitutional system from English and Colonial origins through the Civil War.

HIST 517H.  United States Constitutional History to 1865 Honors   (3).

General education humanities course. The evolution of the American constitutional system from English and Colonial origins through the Civil War.

HIST 518.  United States Constitutional History from 1865   (3).

General education humanities course. American constitutional development from Reconstruction to the present.

HIST 518H.  United States Constitutional History from 1865 Honors   (3).

General education humanities course. American constitutional development from Reconstruction to the present.

HIST 519.  Introduction to Local and Community History   (3).

Introduces the study of local history and community history. Discusses the various venues through which local and community history takes place including historic preservation, archival administration, museum studies, documentary work and writing for a variety of audiences. Students learn relevant practices as well as issues that face those who study local topics and/or specific communities. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or instructor's consent.

HIST 519H.  Introduction to Local and Community History Honors   (3).

Introduces the study of local history and community history. Discusses the various venues through which local and community history takes place including historic preservation, archival administration, museum studies, documentary work and writing for a variety of audiences. Students learn relevant practices as well as issues that face those who study local topics and/or specific communities. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or instructor's consent.

HIST 522.  United States Foreign Relations Since 1898   (3).

General education humanities course. Examines U.S. foreign relations from the wars of 1898 through the Forever Wars of the early 21st century. Examines topics including war in the Philippines, colonialism, World Wars, technology and warfare, the Cold War, humanitarian intervention, U.S. involvement in civil conflicts, oil politics, and drone warfare. Students consider how ideas about race, religion and modernization influenced the rise and exercise of U.S. power abroad. Throughout, the course contextualizes U.S. foreign relations within and their global context. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 523.  Special Topics in History   (3).

An umbrella course created to explore a variety of subtopics differentiated by letter (e.g., 523A, 523B). Not all subtopics are offered each semester – see the course schedule for availability. Students enroll in the lettered courses with specific topics in the titles rather than in this root course. These upper division courses in history are taken individually with a given instructor. Each lettered course may be taken only twice for credit toward a history major or master’s in history.

HIST 525.  American Military History   (3).

General education humanities course. Surveys the American military heritage and its role in shaping the modern United States. Studies the history of warfare from frontier conflicts during the Colonial period through Desert Storm, focusing on the most significant wars and battles, and the evolution of military institutions and their impact on American social, economic and political traditions.

HIST 527.  African-American Business History   (3).

Cross-listed as ETHS 381G. Surveys the history of African-Americans as entrepreneurs and business people. Drawing from a commercial tradition dating back to pre-trans-Atlantic Africa, business minded blacks overcame a variety of obstacles (such as slavery and Jim Crow segregation) to establish a commercial presence in America. Besides chronicling these efforts, the course also examines why African-American business history has traditionally received minimal attention in both the realms of American business history and African-American history. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 528.  History of Wichita   (3).

General education humanities course. A history of Wichita, Kansas, 1865-present, emphasizing the lessons of local history for future planning and its importance to an individual citizen's sense of place.

HIST 530.  The American Woman in History   (3).

General education humanities course. Cross-listed as WOMS 530. Examines the history, status and changing role of women in American society. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 531.  American Environmental History   (3).

General education humanities course. Examines the historical, physical, economic, scientific, technological and industrial interactions of the peoples of America with their environment. Emphasizes the period 1800-present. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 535.  History of Kansas   (3).

General education humanities course. History of the Kansas region from Spanish exploration to the present, emphasizing the period after 1854.

HIST 536.  Survey of American Indian History   (3).

General education humanities course. Surveys the history of Native American nations from prehistoric times to the present. Includes the process of European colonization and indigenous responses, the strategies of accommodation, assimilation and resistance, and the resurgence of tribalism in the 20th century. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 541.  Modern France   (3).

General education humanities course. History of the major trends in French history from Napoleon to DeGaulle emphasizing French attempts to adjust politically, socially, economically and culturally to the changing conditions of modern industrial society.

HIST 542.  Religion in America   (3).

Cross-listed as REL 542. Surveys various religious traditions in American history from Colonial times to the present. Discusses how religions, groups, beliefs and issues have changed over time and how they interact with each other. Includes the different branches of Christianity and Judaism, the study of awakenings and revivals, the stories of prominent religious thinkers and leaders, immigrant religious traditions, the tensions between liberal and traditional religious forms, the prophetic and apocalyptic traditions in American, and the impact of Native American, Asian and African beliefs and practices on the religious landscape.

HIST 551.  The U.S. Army Since the Vietnam War   (3).

Cross-listed as MILS 351. Examines the history of the U.S. Army after the end of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. Examines how the U.S. Army was shaped by the Vietnam War and its aftermath, and how that Army responded to the loss of the United States’ only near-peer competitor with the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War. Examines the competing strains of thought on the Army’s future through the competing lenses of its 1990s low-intensity conflict military interventions and its struggle to modernize in an era of shrinking budgets. Concludes by examining how these events shaped the U.S. Army’s performance in the ongoing wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria.

HIST 559.  Classical Athens   (3).

General education humanities course. Focuses on Athens from the sixth to the fourth centuries, from the emergence of the Greek city state to the age of Demosthenes. Examines how Athens founded and maintained the earliest democracy and how individuals such as Socrates, Pericles, Plato and Aristotle fit into their society. Other topics may include warfare, the family, farming, commerce and the law.

HIST 560.  The Hellenistic World and Rise of Rome   (3).

General education humanities course. Begins with the conquests of Alexander the Great and provides an overview of the new Greek world which he left behind. Examines changes in Greek culture and society as a result of the spread of Hellenism to the older kingdoms of the New East and India. Includes the rise of the Roman Republic in the context of the Greek world in the first century B.C. with the defeat of Cleopatra, or the last queen of Egypt.

HIST 562.  Roman Republic   (3).

General education humanities course. Covers the period of early Roman history from the founding of the city to the first emperor Augustus. Includes coverage of wars and the Roman army, government, society and culture. Emphasizes the end of the republic during the dictatorship of Julius Caesar, the civil wars, and the role of the emperor Augustus.

HIST 566.  Medieval History 500-1200   (3).

General education humanities course. The history of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire through the Crusades, 500 to 1200.

HIST 567.  Medieval History 1200-1500   (3).

General education humanities course. History of Europe, 1200 to 1500.

HIST 575.  Italian Renaissance   (3).

General education humanities course. Italian history from the 14th through the 16th centuries emphasizing cultural achievements.

HIST 576.  The Reformations: From Heresies to Diversity   (3).

General education humanities course. Cross-listed as REL 576. Studies the religious changes in the 16th century in political, social and intellectual contexts. Includes the Medieval and Renaissance background of the reformations and the major doctrinal issues that separated Catholic and Protestant groups. Explores how major figures and movements developed their theologies and political strategies from the 15th century through the Catholic Reformation and the Thirty Years’ War. Additionally, explores what these reformations mean for us in the 21st century world of religious pluralism.

HIST 579.  Asian Women in Modern History   (3).

Cross-listed as ETHS 579 and WOMS 579. Examines women's historical and contemporary experiences in Asian America and eight major countries in modern Asia. Covers topics on Asian women's activism in relation to nationalism and women's rights. Investigates Asian women's roles and statuses in the family and society and their educational attainment and contributions to the export-oriented industrialization of the Asia-Pacific region. Examines the intra-regional migration of female guest workers among various countries in Asia. Traces the ways in which the changes in immigration laws during the 20th century affect patterns of Asian women's migration to the United States. Introduces writing that integrates Asian women's lives and Asian American experiences into the discourses on ethnicity, national origin, class, gender and sexual orientation in the United States and the Asia-Pacific region. Course includes diversity content.

HIST 581.  Europe 1789-1870   (3).

General education humanities course. A focused survey of European social, cultural and political history from 1789-1870. Among the topics covered are the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, industrialization, Romanticism, nationalism, liberalism, socialism, the revolutions of 1848, and the role of women in European society.

HIST 582.  Europe 1871-1945   (3).

General education humanities course. A focused survey of European history between the years 1871-1945. Among the subjects covered are the phenomena of nation building and the imperial project, the rise and growth of European socialism, the emergence of a "mass society," the role of women and minorities, the origins and impact of World War I, inter-war politics and diplomacy, the Nazi Era, and World War II.

HIST 583.  Europe 1945-Present   (3).

A survey of European history, 1945-present.

HIST 588.  History of Early Russia   (3).

General education humanities course. Covers the social, political and cultural history of Kievan and Muscovite Russia.

HIST 589.  History of Imperial Russia   (3).

General education humanities course. A survey of the political, social and cultural history of Imperial Russia.

HIST 592.  History of Soviet Union   (3).

General education humanities course. A survey of Soviet history from the Bolshevik Revolution to the present.

HIST 593.  Former Soviet Union   (3).

General education humanities course. Examines contemporary life in the former USSR: historical background, Marxist/Leninist ideology, industrial and agricultural economies, roles played by women, national minorities and dissidents in Soviet society, the press, literature and art, health care, and prospects for the country's future.

HIST 599AE.  1960s in Europe   (3).

Cross-listed as HIST 399AE. The 1960s evoke considerable debate: were they a period of emancipation? Or were they an era of disorder? This course explores the politics, social movements and cultural phenomenon which emerged during the 1960s in both Eastern and Western Europe. We will pay particular attention to how contemporaries made sense of the changes they were experiencing, and how they strove to translate youthful energy and activism into sustained cultural change. Above all, this course seeks to examine what was the meaning of the 1960s and what were its consequences.

HIST 599AF.  Vietnam Conflict in Film   (3).

Cross-listed as HIST 399AF. A retrospective study of America’s longest and most divisive war. The goal of the course is to compare and contrast Hollywood’s version of the war, which may be highly romanticized and subjective, with what professional historians and documentaries have said. It is anticipated that the students’ knowledge and understanding of the war will be enhanced, and their critical viewing skills sharpened. Students will view a series of film, documentary as well as feature films, that deal with the war. These films will provide an in-depth treatment of several selected topics. Each viewing will be preceded by a lecture providing background and will be followed by class discussion about the merits, accuracy, and interpretation provided in the feature film.

HIST 599AG.  American Law and Film   (3).

American popular culture has demonstrated an enduring fascination with lawyers, the law and the legal system. Course focuses on the portrayal of attorneys and the legal system in films. Uses films as a lens through which to examine the American criminal and civil justice systems, lawyers and legal education, and social and civil rights, while considering how film helps shape public perception of lawyers, creates viewer expectations regarding law and justice, and may influence the conduct of practicing attorneys and judges.

HIST 599AI.  Nazism and the Third Reich   (3).

Cross-listed as HIST 399Z. Introduces the history of Nazism in Germany during the 1930s and 1940s. Focuses on the political, social and cultural manifestations of Nazism, and the consequences for both German society and the wider world down to the present day.

HIST 599W.  Law in American History   (3).

Examines the role that law plays in American society from the early Colonial settlements through the 20th century. Examines the connection between law and society in four parts: crime and punishment in early America; property, economy and American identity; the 15th Amendment and questions of female citizenship; and the origins of the Civil Rights movement. By looking at laws and court cases in the larger context of American social history, students gain a fuller understanding of the impact and influence that law has on the development of American society.

HIST 599WH.  Law in American History Honors   (3).

Examines the role that law plays in American society from the early Colonial settlements through the 20th century. Examines the connection between law and society in four parts: crime and punishment in early America; property, economy and American identity; the 15th Amendment and questions of female citizenship; and the origins of the Civil Rights movement. By looking at laws and court cases in the larger context of American social history, students gain a fuller understanding of the impact and influence that law has on the development of American society.

HIST 698.  Historiography   (3).

Required of undergraduate history majors. This capstone course engages students in a systematic analysis of major historians and schools of historical thought. Class assignments and discussions encourage students to examine their own ideas about history as an academic discipline. Prerequisite(s): 12 upper-division hours in history or instructor's consent.

HIST 703.  Museum Administration   (3).

Addresses the many facets of museum administration from a specialist's point of view. Covers collecting, management, law and ethics, and resource development. Gives a close view of the operations of American museums. Prerequisite(s): HIST 701 or instructor's consent.

HIST 725.  Advanced Historical Methods   (3).

Reviews basic historical research methods, the general character of field bibliographies and recent interpretations, and the techniques of professional narrative development. Required of graduate degree students during their first year of enrollment. Fulfills the university's professional and scholarly integrity training requirement covering research misconduct, publication practices and responsible authorship, conflict of interest and commitment, ethical issues in data acquisition, management, sharing and ownership. Prerequisite(s): departmental consent.

HIST 727.  Readings In History   (1-3).

Readings in ancient, medieval, modern, European and American field bibliographies. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite(s): departmental consent.

HIST 730.  Seminar American History   (3).

Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite(s): departmental consent.

HIST 733.  Seminar European History   (3).

Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite(s): departmental consent.

HIST 750.  Workshop in History   (2-3).

Repeatable for credit but does not satisfy requirements for history majors.

HIST 781.  Cooperative Education   (1-2).

Graduate history students participate in internship experiences through the cooperative education program. May substitute for HIST 803. A maximum of 4 credit hours of any combination of HIST 803 and HIST 781 may count toward degree requirements with permission from the program area. Prerequisite(s): instructor's consent.